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    In every family, someone ends up with “the stuff.” It is the goal of The Family Curator to inspire, enlighten, and encourage other family curators in their efforts to preserve and share their own family treasures.

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    Entries in salt lake city (4)

    Monday
    Feb172014

    RootsTech 2014 Photo Album (with Captions and Comments)

    Every parent knows that two-year olds can be challenging. They push against convention, fall, and usually get up to do it all over again.

    RootsTech 2012 was a lot like that toddler, feeling his way in the big genealogy technology universe. Not quite sure what would work, what wouldn’t work, but all the time trusting that eventually he’d figure it out.

    And then, the toddler turns three . . . and four.

    RootsTech has grown up, and the 2014 conference put this event “behind the wheel” with a real Driver’s License.

    RootsTech2012

    Blogger Meetup for dinner at Roots Tech 2012. 

    I first attended the genealogy tech conference in 2012 when RootsTech was held in a smaller venue area at the Salt Palace Convention Center. The exhibit hall was noisy and crowded and it was difficult to find the session classrooms. The program seemed heavily tilted toward developers and beginners with little for intermediate or advanced genealogists. Networking and F2F blogger meet-ups, however, made it a worthwhile event.

    Fast-forward to 2014 and a whole new RootsTech experience.

    Entrance to RootsTech2014

    Entrance to the Salt Palace Convention Center for RootsTech 2014.
    A bigger, better venue for 2014.

    First impression walking in the Salt Palace Convention Center entry was “Wow!” The immense two-level hall was decked with enormous banners showcasing family history photos, vendors, and slogans. Standing on the upper level and looking through the huge glass windows, views of the Expo Hall showed continual demonstrations, products, and displays.

    RootsTech2014 foyer banner

    RootsTech2014 expo foyer

    RootsTech2014 expo window

    Beyond the Expo Hall, session rooms were large enough to accommodate most crowds with great audio visual arrangements.

    My biggest dilemma of the the three-day event was trying to squeeze In attending other sessions between presenting four sessions and signing books at the Family Tree University booth in the Expo Hall.

    RootsTech2014 ftu booth

    RootsTech2014 ftu dolan levenick moss

    Family Tree University booth in the RootsTech Expo Hall, with
    Allison Dolan (left) and Tyler Moss. 

    I didn’t get to hear author Dr. Thomas Jones, or geneticist Blaine Bettinger, or Laura Prescott, or CeCe Moore, or Judy Russell, or Lisa Alzo, or a host of other great speakers because there was just so much going on! And with sessions for ALL levels of genealogical and tech experience, there was a lot to choose from.

    However, I did get to flop down in the Backblaze Theatre front and center in the main hall to rest my feet and soak up presentations from several product developers. As bloggers Amy Coffin and Caroline Pointer said, “This is the awe-some. ‘They’ come to you.”

    A semi-circle of black and white couches and armchairs faced a large screen and podium. Every fifteen minutes a new vendor or presenter took the stage to demonstrate their product or share a some kind of software or hardware feature. Their presentation was punctuated by the “candy lady” who came around with a basket of deliciousness, and the “ticket lady” who passed out door-prize tickets. Every fifteen minutes.

    Clearly, RootsTech has figured out that not every attendee has the stamina of the kids attending Saturday’s Discovery Day. But whereever you are in your own family history search, RootsTech 2014 offered something just for you.

    Monday
    Jan132014

    What's Better Than a Genealogy Conference in Salt Lake City?

    Answer: A genealogy conference AND a week-long genealogy institute AND research at the Family History Library!

    I love this banner outside the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.

    The snow was falling Wednesday morning when I arrived in Salt Lake City, which means only one thing to a genealogist -- it's a great day for The Library! And I wasn't the only one who thought so. Colleagues from all corners of the country were busily working at the research tables and film readers.It always takes me a good half-day to get re-acquainted with where I am and what I need to do, but every visit to the FHL makes my orientation easier. I had a list of films and filming "projects" ready to go and was able to make good progress.

    Unfortunately, fellow Californian Sheri Fenley was stuck in fog and fuel-delays and missed most of the research day, but she was around for a great meal at The Red Iguana with SLIG Coordinator Christy Fillerup and friends.

     

    Meeting new and old friends for dinner. (Photo thanks to Adele Marcum)

    Arrived at last, The Educated Genealogist Sheri Fenley.

    Friday and Saturday, January 10 and 11, the Association of Professional Genealogists' Professional Management Conference offered two days of networking, workshops, and presentations for the 280 attending APG members. Keynote sessions by D. Joshua Taylor and Judy G. Russell kicked-off each day and a lively dessert reception offered time for networking with colleagues.

    Michelle Goodrum, Elissa Scalise Powell, and Shelley Bishop
    at the APT-PMC Dessert Reception, with Barry Kline in the background!

    Kimberly T. Powell, of Oakdale, Pennsylvania, was introduced as the incoming APG President, succeeding Kenyatta Barry of Santa Monica, California. Cathy Desmarais, CG, of Vermont will serve as APG vice president; Janice Prater of Denver, Colorado will serve as secretary; Joan Peake of West Virgina will serve as treasurer. The full APG Board is named here.

    Genealogists fortunate enough to make travel connections despite weather-related delays took advantage of research hours at the Family History Library. I spent an entire day happily examining microfilm and testing various methods of digitizing films at the film viewer stations. (Results forthcoming!) 

     

    View of Temple Square from the Famiy History Library.

    Sunday in Salt Lake City was a break between events before the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG) gets underway with evening registration and classes on Monday morning. It will be another busy week of genealogy, snow or no-snow!

    Tuesday
    Feb072012

    RootsTech Field Trip to the Utah State Archives

    A visit to the state archive Research Center was at the top of my Salt Lake City ToDo List during RootsTech week, but it was tough to take time out to meet that goal.

    First, there was the ever-present pull of the Family History Center and RootsTech itself. Then, there were the informal meet-ups where new research strategies were brought out for consideration. Finally, it was COLD for a Californian to be out there walking away from the hub of activity.

    I was running out of time by the time I headed toward the glowing railroad depot sign at the end of the street. I only glanced at the Archive address, noting “Located within the historic Denver & Rio Grande Depot.”

    Anyone who attended RootsTech or has walked up and down West South Temple Street (in front of the Radisson) has surely noticed the glowing Union Pacific sign that anchors the end of the street. I incorrectly assumed train = train and headed toward the giant logo. It was a nice walk, although I did end up at the Gateway Mall and the only Depot I found was a nightclub.

    Nice Sign, Wrong Place

    The historic Union Pacific Depot has been renovated and is now a center for shopping, dining, and entertainment.  I needed to be at the Denver & Rio Grande Depot, about a half mile south of the UP Depot.

    If you’d like to visit the Utah State Archives and are staying near the Family History Center, I suggest you take the Trax light rail which stops not far from the Archives on West 200 South.

    The historic Denver & Rio Grande Depot is home to the Utah State Archives and a local favorite, the Rio Grande Café. I savored both.

    Home of the Utah State Archives and Research Center

    Depot interior hosts photo and art exhibits.

    My goal at the Research Center was to examine directories for the years my grandmother lived in Salt Lake City and to see if I could find any other records for her during that time. I may have been hasty with the Archives address, but I did spend some time with the website searching the online databases.

    The Research Center holds records in two distinct divisions:

    Utah State History – manuscripts, photographs, books, and maps about Utah and the West

    Utah State Archives – historic state and local government records in Utah, from 1850 to today (including vital records, divorces, naturalizations, and more)

    The online collection also includes an extensive photograph collection that I plan to look at more carefully from home.

    I was able to search online and find several records I wanted to personally examine: the divorce case between Arline and Albert Edwards, and an unexpected file for Albert Edwards for housebreaking in 1898.

    The Archives staff was extremely helpful in locating the records, especially when it became obvious that the divorce papers didn’t seem to be on the indexed microfilm roll. Instead, my record was one of several that were poorly filmed. The archivist recalled that someone had been in last week also looking for files on that roll; they were located in the original hardcopy form in one of six boxes retained by the Archives and still available from the previous researcher. What luck! He brought me the box in a few minutes and I was soon photocopying the original court filing.

    The Archives will allow photocopying, but not photography.  They also offer research services if you are unable to come to the center in person.

    The Research Center is open Monday through Friday, 9am to 4pm, and located in the historic Denver and Rio Grande Depot at 300 S. Rio Grande Street. It ‘s a lovely walk from the Family History Center.

    View walking out of the Research Center toward
    the snowy mountains, probably hasn't changed much 
    since my grandmother's time in 1917. 

    Saturday
    Feb042012

    Seen at #RootsTech 2012

    It's been a few busy weeks in Salt Lake City with both #RootsTech and the Salt Lake Institute in town. I am meeting old and new friends everywhere I go, and it's hard to stop and take pictures… but, here's a few from the last few days

    RT201202

    Ever-amusing Mr. GeneaMusings, Randy Seaver sporting his blogger beads in the media center island in the exhibit hall.

    RT201201

    Blogger ladies Caroline Pointer, footnoteMaven, and Kerry Scott also caught in the media center.

    RT201209

    Blue skies and spires above Temple Square across from the Family History Library.

    Last night's late night event at the FHL was played to a packed audience. I didn't make it til the closing bell at midnight, but the tables and film readers were still humming with activity when I left about 10 pm. That's dedication! And I heard rumors of follow-up visits today.