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    Entries in paulen (2)

    Thursday
    Feb042010

    Part 2 The Documents, Reading Between the Lines, The Marriage Records of Arline Paulen and Albert F. Edwards

    This is a continuation of the analysis of marriage records recently received from the Wyoming State Archives. Although I already held a decorative Marriage Certificate, I was surprised at how much more there was to learn from the primary documents.

    Read Part  1, Introduction, Reading Between the Lines, The Marriage Records of Arline Paulen and Albert F. Edwards

     

    The papers all seem very straightforward, but I learned quite a bit reading between the lines. I set my questions aside for a time, to transcribe and study the documents. The major points I learned are listed below in boldface type. I am not including complete transciptions here, but highlighting the key points of my inquiry.

    Marriage License Reveals Arline is a "Miss"

    This document gives permission for “any person legally authorized to solemnize Marriage” the authority to marry the named persons, Albert F. Edwards of Salt Lake County, Utah and Miss Arline Paulen of Salt Lake County, Utah, dated 11 Aug 1917. Signed J.B. Martin, County Clerk. The paper appears to be affixed in a file with fasteners and bears the seal of the County Clerk, Uinta County, State of Wyoming. Although the document resembles the Marriage Certificate in Arline’s papers, the text adds the demand that the bearer must return the License to the County Clerk within three months from the date of marriage with a signed Marriage Certificate or pay a penalty of $500.

    Arline is listed as an unmarried woman, “Miss.”

    License to wed is granted 11 Aug 1917.

    I surmise, the State of Utah undertook its charge to record all marriages very seriously, even charging a stiff penalty for failure to comply.

    Certificate of Marriage Shows Groom is Ten Years Older Than Bride

    This document is a statement by Arthur W. Sims, Court Commissioner verifying the marriage of the two applicants at the Courty Court House in Evanston according to the “laws of the State of Wyoming.”

    The marriage takes place on the same day that the license was issued, 11 August 1917.

    Albert Edwards is aged 36

    Miss Arline Paulen is aged 26

    Witnesses to the marriage are M. J. McCraig of Evanston, Wyoming and J.B. Martin, also of Evanston, Wyoming. I wonder if these are local friends of the bride and groom.

    Marriage Affidavit Gives Time of Day

    This is obviously the front of the next copy, the outside informational summary for Albert F. Edwards to Arline Paulen filing for record in the County Clerk’s office 11 August 1917 at 12:45 p.m. and recorded in Book 80 of Marriage Records on Page 164, signed by J. B. Martin, County Clerk, by M. I. McCraig, Deputy.

    The events at the county courthouse take place midday. Funny. Didn’t civil servants take lunch break in 1917?

    McCraig, listed as a witness is not a friend, but an available Witness, probably not known to the couple

     

    Statement of Applicant for a Marriage License Names Salt Lake City as Residence

    This page bears two statements, completed and signed by the two parties. The top statement is signed by Albert F. Edwards swearing that his full and true name is Albert F. Edwards residing at Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, over 21, and his bride to be is Arline Paulen of Salt Lake, Salt Lake, Utah.

    The second statement is made by Arline Paulen a resident of Salt Lake City, Utah, bearing witness that Albert F. Edwards is a resident of Salt Lake City in the County of Salt Lake, Utah, and over age 21.

    Both statements bear a sentence stating that there are no legal impediments to the aforesaid persons marrying according to the laws of their state of residence or this state. Each statement is signed by the applicant as well as by J. B. Martin, County Clerk, dated 11 Aug 1917.

    Residence is Salt Lake City, Utah for both parties

    Names and legal ages are confirmed

    The final two photocopies are image copies of the actual record book where the county clerk copied the original documents into the record. Everything is in the same handwriting and signed by J. B. Martin, County Clerk, by M. I. McCraig, Deputy. I carefully compare these copies to the originals to see if there are any discrepancies, but the conscientious deputy has done a good job making a clear and legible record.

    . . . More to Come

     

    Tuesday
    Feb022010

    Reading Between the Lines, The Marriage Records of Arline Paulen and Albert F. Edwards, Part 1, Introduction

    I love mail. After posting Organize and Preserve Original Documents Used in Your Genealogy Research, I took a closer look at the 1917 marriage certificate used to illustrate the article.

     

    Although I had examined the certificate many times, the certificate posed at least three more questions and showed me the surprises that can be found in seeking out the primary source documents.

    I wondered:

    Was Arline Paulen really divorced from her first husband at the date of her marriage to Edwards?

    Why did Arline and Albert Edwards marry in Wyoming when I knew she was living in Salt Lake City?

    Where was Utah County, Wyoming? I couldn’t find it in the Red Book.

    Who were the witnesses? Friends of the couple?

    Was the certificate “real”?

    A quick Google search for Wyoming vital records led me to the office of the Wyoming State Archives. My email query as to the availability of a marriage record for Arline Paulen and Albert Edwards was quickly answered. Yes, the record was available; I could receive a copy for 50 cents per page, payable by credit card over the telephone. It was so easy that I wish I had more Wyoming ancestors.

    Less than one week later I received a large manila envelope in the mail containing six photocopies:  

    1. Marriage License
    2. Certificate of Marriage
    3. Marriage Affidavit
    4. Statement of Applicant for a Marriage License Marriage License
    5. Statement of Applicant for a Marriage License, with Corroborative Statement
    6. Statement of Applicant for a Marriage License, with Corroborative Statement

    The first two items were from the Uinta County marriage book; the applicants’ statements werefrom the files of the Uinta County clerk.

    I was glad to confirm the name of the bride and groom, and to discover their ages. I was surprised to find that the groom was ten years older than his bride. That was a surprise. In the next article I will post images and discuss what I learned from each document.