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    In every family, someone ends up with “the stuff.” It is the goal of The Family Curator to inspire, enlighten, and encourage other family curators in their efforts to preserve and share their own family treasures.

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    Entries in NGS (5)

    Thursday
    May152014

    Well Done APG: New Youth Membership Level

    Student Grant Award

    The Association of Professional Genealogists is to be commended for adding a new Youth Member level to encourage participation by young genealogists. Well done! The change was announced this spring by Kimberly Powell, APG President and is only one part of the overall restructuring of dues designed to create consistency for North American and International memberships.

    The new Youth Member category expressly promotes the involvement of young genealogists, many who are students or recent college graduates and might find it a hardship to join a professional organization at the full rate.

    When we considered founding the Suzanne Winsor Freeman Student Genealogy Grant in 2010, very few genealogy conferences, societies, or organizations offered a student or youth rate for membership or participation, although "the future of genealogy" was a popular and much-discussed topic.

    The Southern California Genealogy Society Genealogy Jamboree has offered a student scholarship for several years and has partnered with the Freeman Student Grant cash award since 2011. 

    In 2013, the National Genealogical Society offered for the first time a youth conference registration rate for the 2013 Las Vegas Convention, setting a new standard for the national conference.

    The Federation of Genealogical Societies Conference makes a discounted student rate available to current students of all ages attending elementary to graduate school.

    I am especially excited by APG's commitment to young professional genealogists and hope that more organizations will take a cue from APG's membership rates to add a Youth Member policy.

    APG continues to offer a wealth of services to its members including professional development programs, a monthly e-newsleter, website, APG Quarterly Journal, and online webinars. Membership most worthwhile for any professional genealogist of any age.

    Kudos APG!

    Do you know of other genealogy organizations or conferences offering a Youth or Student rate? Please give them a shout-out in the comments!

    Tuesday
    Apr302013

    Why #NGS2013? Why Vegas?

    Is it worth your time and money to attend a national genealogy conference? I think so, and I am honored to share my experiences today in a guest post on the NGS 2013 Conference Blog, Why NGS 2013? Why Vegas? 5 Reasons to Attend a National Genealogy Conference.

    You'll see that I'm a big fan of genealogy education and taking taking advantage of learning opportunities in many forms, whether by webinar, seminar, meeting experts, talking with vendors about new products and services, or attending lectures. Conferences bring together in one place so many ways to learn more about genealogy that it's impossible to pick just one favorite reason to attend.

    Fortunately, Las Vegas is practically next door to southern California which makes this event even higher on my "Can't Miss" list. If you will be attending NGS2013, please say "Hello" if you see me in the hall or classes. 

    What about your conference experiences?

    What do you learn from national meetings?

    Read more about NGS 2013 at the Conference Blog. And, thank you to NGS for inviting all Official Bloggers to submit a guest post for the Conference Blog!

    Monday
    Apr222013

    It's Official. Clark Kent and Lois Lane Are On the Job

     

    To Be Official or Not To Be Official: That is the Question.

    Recent discussion regarding the notion and nature of "Official" bloggers for genealogy events has caused some ruffled feathers and a few nasty hen-pecks in the yard.

    I've been blogging since 2007 and writing about conferences, seminars, and other genealogy events whenever I attended something I wanted to share. I have been an "Official" blogger for a few events, but mostly I have acted in an "unofficial" capacity.

    As a former newspaper reporter, I tend to think in terms of the 5Ws even while an event is unfolding around me. The old pyramid-style story is often framed in my mind before I get to my keyboard. Blogging about conferences and other genealogy experiences comes almost more easily than writing about my own family history. So, why have I bothered to request "Official" status at events rather than continue in an unofficial capacity?

    It all comes down to access. And every journalist worth his or her pencil wants to get the inside scoop on breaking news to share with her readers. Conference officials hold the key to that inside story, and they need the media to help spread the word. In the old days we used to get a "Press Pass." Sometimes you wrote a story, sometimes you didn't. It was all considered PR and part of doing business. That "Official" Press Pass to Disneyland made me the envy of my high school friends, but no one beat me up over it.

    Be Glad Clark Kent and Lois Lane Are On The Job

    Bloggers serve much the same purpose as an old-fashioned press corps. By using "Official" status, a conference or seminar can more easily distribute news to a group of "information vendors." Novice reporters wisely use their event access to get noticed by a target built-in audience, thereby increasing their own visibility. Experienced reporters can be relied on to see an event in the context of other similar events over many years; consider that a lack of articles is as much a critique of an event as a blasting commentary.

    I've never been particularly good at writing nasty reviews. I've preferred, instead, to heed my mother's advice, "If you can't say anything nice. . ."

    I don't plan to cover all facets of upcoming National Genealogical Society conference in Las Vegas. It would be impossible. An old-fashioned press corps would divide some of the "beats" among several reporters to insure all areas were covered. And, if Official Bloggers want to work out some "unofficial" NGS news beats, I am all for collaboration.

    I do plan to keep an eye on what my fellow NGS 2013 Official Bloggers are writing about the event. I don't want to simply rehash what's already been said, and it may be tough to find a fresh angle with nearly two dozen bloggers reporting throughout the conference.

    I may not write a dozen articles about NGS 2013, after all, I am attending the conference because I want to hear the speakers and sessions, but you can be sure that what I do write about will be honest and timely. Official or un-official.

    [My two cents.]

    Monday
    Apr082013

    National Genealogical Society Conference App Now Available

    NGS Quad Graphic

    Building New Bridges: NGS 2013 Conference Las Vegas

    The National Genealogical Society has announced a new mobile Conference App for the 2013 Conference May 8-11 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The App is available for iOS, Blackberry, Android, Windows Phones, and web-enabled devices from the NGS Mobile App page.

    The App Dashboard will provide late-breaking information, alerts, a built-in Twitter feed, and the ability to sync personal schedules across devices. 

    The Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree was the first conference I attended with a mobile app on my smartphone and it added a new dimension to the conference experience. I especially like helpful updates on schedule and room changes, and the ability to create a personal schedule I can refer to throughout the day.

    I will be attending NGS 2013 in Las Vegas and sharing my experiences on The Family Curator and through Twitter and Facebook. Whether you will be in Las Vegas or following the conference from home, the new NGS Conference App will be helpful for keeping up with the action throughout the week. 

    Thursday
    Apr292010

    Snow Day at NGS 2010 Salt Lake City

    It's not a bad kind of snow day when you can spend the day inside a beautiful convention center attending top-notch genealogy lectures and checking out all the newest tech-toys for genealogists. It's even better when you can run through the white stuff to spend a few hours surrounded by microfilm at the Family History Center.

    Day Two at the National Genealogical Society 2010 Conference dawned cold and white, quite a surprise for the Californians, Floridians, and Hawaiians in attendance. Like Randy Seaver, I too attended Elizabeth Shown Mills' outstanding presention yesterday, and planned to hear her talk today.

    On Wednesday I also attended an excellent lecuture by John T. Humphrey on Understanding the Process that Creates the Records and came away with a plan to outline the probate requirements for the states I am researching. John's examples demonstrated that knowing the record-making process can speed research and add value to the work.

    I also attended the International Society of Family History Writers and Editors Banquet where I sat next to Renee Huskey of Photoloom, and met several family history writers from across the country. Michael Leclerc spoke shared a few Tales from the Editor's Desk, and gave us all a glimpse at life inside the New England Historic Genealogical Society.

    Today was a full day of speakers, vendor visits, and library look-ups. I heard Claire Bettag on Research Reports: Meeting the Standards, Elizabeth Shown Mills on What Kind of Document is This: Original? Derivative? Primary? Secondary? or Whatchamacallit? and Kay Haviland Freilich on From Research to Report: How to Write a Proof Summary. Each presenter stressed the Genealogical Proof Standard and BCG standards; it was clear that the BCG Skillbuilding track was well-planned and carefully coordinated among speakers.

    I also managed to squeeze in a short look-up at the Family History Library for the probate of James Winsor, died 1801. Now I have a few references and will try to get back to find the "good stuff." I have been very impressed with the Library staff -- helpful, friendly, knowledgeable, and very accomodating. The Library must have added extra help this week because the books are being shelved almost as fast as they are returned to the cart, and the assistants keep the microfilm printer/scanner line moving smoothly.

    I finally caught up with Sheri Fenley, The Educated Genealogist, and Donna Pointkowski, What's Past is Prologue, for dinner and a lilttle SLC field trip. It was great to compare conference sessions and research tips.

    Another busy day is slated for tomorrow; I hope the snow holds off until we get inside the Salt Palace Convention Center, and then it can blow a gale!