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    In every family, someone ends up with “the stuff.” It is the goal of The Family Curator to inspire, enlighten, and encourage other family curators in their efforts to preserve and share their own family treasures.

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    Entries in LasVegas (5)

    Tuesday
    May142013

    Hitting the Jackpot at #NGS2013

    Ten Tweets to Richmond

     

    With Mystery Judge Gena Philibert-Ortega
    (photo courtesy Randy Seaver and Kathryn Doyle) 

    The NGS Las Vegas Twitter Challenge was a fun event encouraging attendees to tweet as they completed ten (fairly challenging) tasks throughout the conference week. Each task required a photo and inclusion of the official challenge hashtag #ngs2013hunt, as well as the challenge number. In addition, participants were encouraged to incorporate the conference theme -- Building New Bridges -- in some way.

    Rather than a blind drawing for all participants, the "most creative and innovative entry overall" would be selected as the winner by a secret judge. Whew! 

    With encouragement of my genealogy blogging friends, I managed to complete all ten tasks AND be present for the announcement of the winner. It was a good thing Kathryn Doyle was keeping up on all the news, because my car was packed and I was nearly headed home early for Mom's Day when I got her message to stick around for the final announcement.

    Gena Philibert-Ortega was revealed to be the mystery judge and announced the winners -- Holly Simmons and Denise Levenick! Woo-hoo. Looks like I'll be headed to Richmond next spring. Thank you VERY MUCH NGS!

    #NGS2013Hunt Twitterstream

    Genealogy Dress Code: Hard Hats Required (kilt wearers exempt)! #NGS2013hunt Challenge1 http://t.co/edeCrE8zVI

     

    No lunchbox & thermos needed at the BCG luncheon. #NGS2013hunt challenge 2 with Diane Gravel & Joan Peake. http://t.co/wylzzoWQ3t

     Checking out new tools for building bridges w/NGS publications. #NGS2013hunt Challenge#3. http://t.co/DXRKHPIDjh 

    Found a helpful NGS Ask Me volunteer who fixed my specs without any tools! thanks Lenny! #NGS2013hunt Challenge 4 http://t.co/B7upZJ8wXR

    #NGS2013 Exhibit Hall buzzing.Talked w/Treelines about gr8 new tool to build bridges betwn now/then. #NGS2013hunt #5 http://t.co/9rN2903Xqx

     

    Spreadsheet as #genealogy tool for building bridges to ancestors' past w Jill Crandall #NGS2013hunt Geek Chlng 6 http://t.co/pXeT7iILd9

    Yes, it's Vegas, Baby for #NGS2013. Ready to build new bridges. #NGS2013hunt Challenge 7 http://t.co/Plx35KGDpV

    @walkingyourtree wins longest #NGS2013 badge WOW! She could build a bridge with those ribbons! #NGS2013hunt clue 8 http://t.co/8NsSdT2VrD

    Networking about building bridges with Pam Eagleson & Stefani Evans for #NGS2013hunt challenge #9 http://t.co/WgbkK2Qzfk

    Rubbing shoulders w/ NGS celeb Laura deGrazia, she knows the best tools for NY Research #NGS2013hunt Challenge 10 http://t.co/QPAYAA7aHl

    Sunday
    May122013

    NGS 2013 Vegas Day 3: It's All in the Details

    It's becoming a challenge to continue my rather abbreviated summary of presentations at the National Genealogical Society Conference in Las Vegas. As I thought about what key lesson tied together the sessions I attended on Friday, the theme became obvious -- it was all in the details, or as Elizabeth Shown Mills emphasized "a researcher is a nitpicker."

    Here are a few notes on my schedule for the day:

    J. Mark Lowe -- Bible Thumper or Pious Pilgrim: Relgious Ancestors on the Frontier
    I wish my Bible Church ancestors left more detailed records (heck, I wish they left church records, at ALL!)
    Mark Lowe's description of the rich records in some denominations made me long for converts in my family tree. 

    Elizabeth Shown Mills -- Trousers, Beds, Black Domestic, Tacks and Housekeeping Bills: "Trivial Details" Can Solve Research Problems!
    Be a nitpicker with details.
    THINK long and hard and every which way about the information you find. Details hide answers to tough questions. 

    Jill Crandall -- Microsoft Excel: A Little-Known Genealogy Research Tool
    Excel wasn't designed for historical detail. 
    Jill Crandall makes a good case for using spreadsheets to analyze data, but I still find it easier to use tables and charts. Sorry! I DID learn, however, that you have to do some gymnastics if you want Excel to recognize dates before 1 Jan 1900 on a PC (190? on a Mac).

    Dr. Tom Jones -- Planning "Reasonably Exhaustive" Research
    Detail, Detail, Detail
    I seem to be on the methodology and Skillbuilding Tracks and the lessons to plan, document, and analyze are creating a refrain. Dr. Jones makes this task seem very do-able and not nearly as intimidating as it sounds.  

    I'm working up a list of JAMB recordings to purchase because there are so many enticing lectures I want to attend running concurrently. I noticed that JAMB is also selling 4-CD sets of lectures by Paula Stuart Warren, John Humphrey, Elizabeth Shown Mills, and Dr. Tom Jones. Worth checking out!

    Monday
    May062013

    I'll See You in Paradise (Road) for #ngs2013 

    Las Vegas By Any Other Name

    Genealogists love names. Misspelled surnames, mangled forenames, and oft-repeated town names are at the root of many research problems, but we can only imagine the experience of future Las Vegas family historians.

    The nickname, Vegas, Baby, like The Big Apple, holds a distinction as a wildly successful marketing ploy. But before this latest moniker, Las Vegas held other, equally popular nicknames.

    When early Las Vegas consisted of one long street of casinos and hotels, everyone knew what you meant by The Strip, even if you were in Los Angeles talking about a recent cross-desert junket, as in “I just got back from seeing Elvis on The Strip.”

    The Las Vegas Strip is not within Las Vegas proper, but refers to the stretch of Las Vegas Boulevard south of city limits that is home to the largest, flashiest, and most historic casinos and hotels. The nickname is often used to refer to a broader area encompassing other resort casinos or confused with Glitter Gulch or Fremont Street located in the center of the Las Vegas downtown casino area home to the Fremont Hotel, Golden Nugget, The Mint and other casinos.

    Las Vegas has always been the self-proclaimed Wedding Capital of the World – what genealogists would call a “Gretna Green” – and with only 250 miles separating Hollywood and Vegas, it’s not surprising that Vegas was a popular destination for quickie divorces as well.

    The Las Vegas gambling industry led to the nickname Lost Wages, and the easy availability of assorted (legal and illegal) pastimes spawned the moniker Sin City, and the more official Entertainment Capital of the World.

    Nothing Safe from Creative Vegas Street Names

    The 1980s brought widespread resort development to Las Vegas, quickly followed by an explosion in residential development. A brief look at any local map shows the unique Vegas spirit didn’t stop at designing fantasy casinos. We can only imagine the thoughts of future Vegas family historians searching for ancestors on Pillow Talk Court, Fast Lane, Jane Austin Avenue [sic], Vader Avenue, and Leia Street.

    See You on Paradise Road for #NGS2013

    Thankfully, it should be fairly easy to find our way around the NGS Conference area at the Las Vegas Hotel. I plan to be spending most of my time on Paradise Road.

    For More About Las Vegas Street Names –

    Tupac Lane Welcomes You: The Street Names of Las Vegas

    Vegas Today and Tomorrow (great historic photos)

     

    Image Credit: photo by David Vasquez, WikiMedia Commons, public domain

     

     

    Tuesday
    Apr302013

    Why #NGS2013? Why Vegas?

    Is it worth your time and money to attend a national genealogy conference? I think so, and I am honored to share my experiences today in a guest post on the NGS 2013 Conference Blog, Why NGS 2013? Why Vegas? 5 Reasons to Attend a National Genealogy Conference.

    You'll see that I'm a big fan of genealogy education and taking taking advantage of learning opportunities in many forms, whether by webinar, seminar, meeting experts, talking with vendors about new products and services, or attending lectures. Conferences bring together in one place so many ways to learn more about genealogy that it's impossible to pick just one favorite reason to attend.

    Fortunately, Las Vegas is practically next door to southern California which makes this event even higher on my "Can't Miss" list. If you will be attending NGS2013, please say "Hello" if you see me in the hall or classes. 

    What about your conference experiences?

    What do you learn from national meetings?

    Read more about NGS 2013 at the Conference Blog. And, thank you to NGS for inviting all Official Bloggers to submit a guest post for the Conference Blog!

    Monday
    Apr082013

    National Genealogical Society Conference App Now Available

    NGS Quad Graphic

    Building New Bridges: NGS 2013 Conference Las Vegas

    The National Genealogical Society has announced a new mobile Conference App for the 2013 Conference May 8-11 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The App is available for iOS, Blackberry, Android, Windows Phones, and web-enabled devices from the NGS Mobile App page.

    The App Dashboard will provide late-breaking information, alerts, a built-in Twitter feed, and the ability to sync personal schedules across devices. 

    The Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree was the first conference I attended with a mobile app on my smartphone and it added a new dimension to the conference experience. I especially like helpful updates on schedule and room changes, and the ability to create a personal schedule I can refer to throughout the day.

    I will be attending NGS 2013 in Las Vegas and sharing my experiences on The Family Curator and through Twitter and Facebook. Whether you will be in Las Vegas or following the conference from home, the new NGS Conference App will be helpful for keeping up with the action throughout the week.