Click Here to Receive New Posts
in Your Inbox

This form does not yet contain any fields.

    10% Off Family Tree University 20% off 125x125

     

     

    SEARCH

    In every family, someone ends up with “the stuff.” It is the goal of The Family Curator to inspire, enlighten, and encourage other family curators in their efforts to preserve and share their own family treasures.

    Now Available

    Follow Me

    Entries in how to archive family keepsakes (5)

    Monday
    Mar102014

    How to Archive Family Keepsakes Kindle Edition Now Available

    HTArchiveFamilyKeepsakes Kindle cover

    Good news if you've looking for a Kindle edition of How to Archive Family Keepsakes. In addition to ePUB, Nook, and iBook editions, the Kindle edition of my book is now available at the Amazon store.

    Every author loves the news that their book is SOLD OUT, but it's even better to know that digital versions are available while the paperback is being reprinted. As a longtime Kindle fan, I'm excited to know that How to Archive Family Keepsakes: Learn How to Preserve Family Photos, Memorabilia and Genealogy Records  joins the Kindle list of fully-searchable, sync able, and portable ebooks.

    Why Go Digital?

    Buying digital versions of books, magazines, and journals is a great way to get started as a "Paper-Less Genealogist." Using born-digital documents cuts down on paper, filing supplies, and storage space. You also gain the ability to search the full-text of a book or article, annotate without permanently marking your copy, and make comments that can be shared via GoodReads or social media.

    Paperless or Paper-Less?

    Genealogists love paper, so going completely digital can be a scary idea. Instead, why not move toward less paper? Preserve your heirloom original documents, but make a conscious effort to create and care for less new paper. Try three easy baby-steps toward a digital life and watch your paper piles of everyday working documents dwindle from a mountain to a molehill.

    Baby Steps to Less Paper

    1. Choose Born-Digital books, magazines, and journals. Eliminate hardcopy clutter.

    2. Print to PDF and file documents in your computer filling system. Avoid printing paper copies of email, receipts, notes.

    3. Pick a Digital Birthday. Pick a date you can remember (birthday, tax day). Go digital from that date forward. You will know where to look -- filing cabinet or computer folders -- depending on the date of the item you need.  

    More Ideas

    For more tips to help you manage less paper in your research and everyday life, see Part 2: Break the Paper Habit of How to Archive Family Keepsakes. You'll find four chapters focusing on digitizing and organizing your genealogy:

    Chapter 9: Organize and Digitize Your Paper Documents

    Chapter 10: Digitize Your Family Archive

    Chapter 11: Organize Your Paper Files

    Chapter 12: Organize Your Computer

    Part 2: Break the Paper Habit is available as a stand-alone Kindle eBook (73 pages) titled How to Organize Family History Paperwork or in the complete 208 page digital edition of How to Archive Family Keepsakes from

    Amazon  

    ShopFamilyTree  

     

    Tuesday
    Jul162013

    Heir Apparent Learns How to Preserve Family Keepsakes

      

    Meet David. He's not quite two years old, but he knows it's important to take good care of your Blankie.

    When David has a question about preserving family keepsakes he turns to How to Archive Family Keepsakes for straightforward advice on storage methods and techniques. 

    Some folks want to throw Blankie under his stroller, other people want to stuff him in the diaper bag (phewwww!). David learned that Blankie, like all textiles, is happiest when he's put away nice and clean and stored in a cool place away from heat, light, and moisture. 

    Blankie isn't very big, so it will be easy to roll him in a clean white sheet and let him take a long nap on the closet shelf. One day. But right now, David has decided it's just fine to keep Blankie nearby. After all, Blankie IS a Family Keepsake.

    In Every Family, Somone Inherits "The Stuff."

    Order your copy How to Archive Family Keepsakes today, and learn how to care for and preserve textiles like Blankie, and all kinds of keepsakes --

    • antique and vintage photographs
    • slides and negatives
    • film and video
    • photo albums
    • scrapbooks
    • diaries and journals
    • Family Bibles
    • genealogy research materials
    • baby albums
    • yearbooks and bound books
    • art
    • furniture
    • china and glassware
    • collectibles
    • musical instruments
    • quilts and samplers
    • clothing
    • military insignia
    • uniforms
    • scouting memorabilia
    • watches and jewelry
    • metal tools
    • toys, dolls, games

    . . . including Hop Hop, David's toy stuffed frog.

    How to Archive Family Keepsakes is available in paperback and ebook editions from Amazon.comShopFamilyTree, iBooksBarnes and Noble, and retail booksellers.

        10% Off 

     

     

     

    Sunday
    Jun162013

    Fieldstone Common Interviews The Family Curator: BlogTalkRadio Staff Pick

    Listen anytime to the latest episode of Fieldstone Common Blog Talk Radio where Marian Pierre-Louis and I talk about the "backstory" to my book How to Archive Family Keepsakes. Although Marian and I have never met in person, we share a common passion for old houses and family treasures.

    I had a great time as the guest on Fieldstone Common and enjoyed answering listener questions on preserving keepsakes. If you have questions or comments after listening to the program, please feel free to leave a comment to this post for my response.

    The 60-minute program is now available for listening via web or iTunes podcast at the Fieldstone Common website, and was named a Staff Pick for this weekend.

     

     

    Wednesday
    Jun052013

    Meet Mr. Curator at #SCGS2013 Jamboree: Vintage Treasure Chest Thursday

    DanOldGreen

    We sold the truck, but Mr. Curator is still in the picture!

    Come by and say "Hello" at the Family Tree Magazine booth VM003 at the Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree in Burbank, Calirfornia Friday through Sunday, June 7-9. I will be signing my book, How to Archive Family Keepsakes all weekend, and Mr. Curator will be helping out on Sunday.

    Bring your family heirloom, archiving, and organizing questions for a free consultation, and plan to attend the presentations on organizing and preserving family keepsakes --

    Paper or Plastic: Preserving Family Keepsakes is a 90-minute hand-on workshop that will include lecture, demonstration, and plenty of archival storage samples for your examination. SU019 10:00 am to 11:30 am.

    Lessons from the Archive is a traditional lecture-presentation, and will be Live-Streamed to home viewers. This session will highlight dos and don'ts for working with inherited collections, and specific case study examples from my home archives. You must pre-register to view the Live-Streamed session by signing-up HERE. SU029 2:30 pm to 3:30 pm.

    See you there!

     

    Wednesday
    Mar062013

    The Genealogy Guys Have "Family Stuff" Too! 

    How to Archive Family Keepsakes Book Review

    GenealogyGuys

    George Morgan and Drew Smith, otherwise known as The Genealogy Guys, have published the The Genealogy Guys Podcast #248 which features a detailed review of How to Archive Family Keepsakes.  From George's comments, it sounds like he's dealing with inherited photographs, documents, and memorabilia like so many family historians.

    I think of the Genealogy Guys Podcast as a kind of World Genealogy News Round-Up, and I'm honored to hear the book featured on their show. The review starts about 15 minutes into the podcast, but you'll want to listen to the entire program to hear George and Drew highlight new record releases, more book reviews, and answers to reader email.

    I'm delighted that you found my new book helpful with your photo digitization project, George. As you say, sometimes we end up as "Accidental Archivists" and although we may not be trained in archival methods, we can learn how to be good caretakers of our ancestor's treasures.

    Thanks, Guys!