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    In every family, someone ends up with “the stuff.” It is the goal of The Family Curator to inspire, enlighten, and encourage other family curators in their efforts to preserve and share their own family treasures.

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    Entries in books (15)

    Wednesday
    Aug062014

    Summer Reading List for Genealogists 

    Part 2: Stretch Your Skills

    When I was teaching and had children in school, summer was a magical time to catch up on all the things I never seemed to have time to tackle during the other three seasons of the year. I dreamed of finishing all my Christmas shopping by September 1, but a trip to the library would send me on a new quest to master the art of canning fresh tomato sauce, or learn about stamp collecting with kids. 

    Genealogists with "other" lives might want to take on a challenging new research skill during a summer lull. It's a great time to be a family researcher, and these recent books are outstanding field books for any expedition.

    The family tree historical maps book 1

    The Family Tree Historical Maps Book: A State-by-State Atlas of US History, 1790-1900 (Family Tree Books, 2014).

    Genealogists use scores of maps, and this new large-format new book from Family Tree Magazine is an attractive and useful reference work for anyone researching American records. Full color United States maps show decade-by-decade changes in the nation's boundaries, and state maps provide milestone timelines to aid in understanding the images. Special maps illustrate average family sizes in 1900 and immigrant concentrations in 1880, among other subjects, and suggest possible themes to weave into your family history sketches.

    Hardcover, PDF eBook Available from ShopFamilyTree and Amazon.

     

    The Family Tree German Genealogy Guide: How to Trace Your Germanic Ancestry in Europe, by James Beidler (Family Tree Books, 2014)

    Did you know that more Americans today "claim German ancestry than any other ethnicity"? It's not surprising that German traditions, foods, and names are found in all fifty United States. In this new guidebook, professional genealogist James Beidler shares strategies for researching German immigrant ancestors, deciphering German-language records, and understanding clues in German names. Extensive lists of German repositories,  sample research requests in German, and helpful handwriting "cheat sheets" make this an especially useful book for historians (like me) seeking German ancestors.

    Paperback; Kindle Available from ShopFamilyTree and Amazon

     

    Advanced Genealogy Research Techniques, by George G. Morgan and Drew Smith (McGraw-Hill Osborne, 2013)

    Paperback; Kindle

    Authors Morgan and Smith, hosts of the popular Genealogy Guys Podcast, hear a lot of brick-wall stories from their listeners and have a good idea of the kinds of research problems that can helped with careful strategy. Generously illustrated and filled with examples and anecdotes, Advanced Genealogy Research Techniques is a solid next-step for the genealogist who feels blocked by elusive records or confused by conflicting information. The chapter on using DNA as part of a research strategy is especially instructive and helpful for anyone looking to understand the basics of genetic genealogy.

     

    Genetic Genealogy: The Basics and Beyond, by Emily D. Aulicino (Author House, 2013)

    Paperback; Kindle

    The fast-moving technology of DNA testing and it's uses for genealogical research have made genetic genealogy a frequent topic in the daily news. Author, speaker, and genealogist Aulicino has written a DNA guidebook that clearly explains the different DNA tests and how each one can be be used to further genealogical research.  Topics such as choosing a testing company, convincing people to take a DNA test, and how to understand the results are among the book's fifteen chapters. 

     

    Mastering Genealogical Proof , by Thomas W. Jones

    Paperback, Kindle

    In this workbook-handbook, Dr. Jones lays out a practical method for working with genealogical information, from locating and citing the bits and pieces you uncover, to evaluating, analyzing, correlating, and assembling evidence into reasonable written conclusions. With self-checking exercises, ample illustrations, charts and examples, MGP is the perfect Summer Learning experience. For an even richer understanding of the concepts, sign up for one of the MGP Study Groups coordinated by Angela McGhie.

     

    For a detailed look at building a personal research library, see Michael Hait's recent blog post at Planting the Seeds, Building a solid genealogy library (part one).

    Save 10% at Shop Family Tree with Offer Code FAMILY10F.  Note: Affiliate links.

    Friday
    Aug012014

    More to the Story than Girl Meets Kilt: What Does Outlander Say About Marriage to a Genealogist?

     

      

    I missed Outlander  in my Summer Reading roundup of genealogy fiction, and Facebook Friends helpfully pointed me to an the all-consuming time-travel historical fiction series. HOW did I miss this series? Outlander series is not new, but with the upcoming debut of the new made-for-tv series, the books by Diana Gabaldon are sure to find a new audience that missed the books the first time around. And, it all starts with a genealogist!

    I've only just started the first stage setting first novel, Outlander, but the English teacher in me is already wondering about the subtext of the storyline. . .

    (No big spoilers here that aren't already in the reviews.)

    The heroine is married to a historian / genealogist and while touring Scotland falls into a time warp. She lands in the arms of her husband's British soldier ancestor, flees, and is rescued by a band of rival Scots, in particular the young, handsome, wounded Jamie. She learns that her husband's ancestor was cruel and ruthless, and appears to be more sympathetic with the Scots. Great conflict. Can't wait to read on.

    But, something about the plot seems so familiar. It reminds me a lot of the stories I've heard from probate attorneys and estate auctioneers about what can happen to a genealogist's legacy when the non-genealogist spouse is left to "dispose" of research, books, and heirlooms. I'm not saying that Claire is a jealous spouse; but, it does make one wonder just how "happily married" she really might be. There are no coincidences in well-crafted fiction. Frank's occupation as historian and genealogist is an integral part of the story, and Claire's ambivalence about Frank's British "hero" ancestor speaks loudly  about her feelings towards Frank and his preoccupation with the past. 

    There's more to this story than girl meets kilt.

    And, maybe it's time to add genealogy to an estate plan and think about What to Keep and What to Throw Away.

    Wednesday
    Jul022014

    The Annual "What Are You Reading This Summer?" Post

    Summer is here, and it's time for The Family Curator's Summer Reading List for Genealogists. You can take the English teacher out of the classroom, but you can't take the book out of her hands.

    Each summer reading selection:

    1. is for or about genealogy and family history,
    2. is well-written, and
    3. is so enriching, engaging, or entertaining that you want to turn the page.

    Of course, we won't all agree on what makes a great, or even good, genealogy book, but I hope this list gives you a few new titles to try this summer. And do keep in mind something your English teacher probably never told you: If you don't like the book, it's okay to put it down and find another one. Books are a lot like vegetables; tastes change. Try it again later.

    The Summer Reading List for Genealogists will be presented in two parts with reading suggestions for assorted moods, whims, and needs.

    Part 1: R & R for Genealogists (or Relax and Read) offers fiction to lose yourself in, just in time for the long July Fourth Weekend. If you like series mysteries or historical fiction I hope you find something new to read here.

    Part 2: Stretch Your Skills, Learn Something New This Summer showcases recently published genealogy manuals and instructional titles. A thorough study of any titles from this list will lead to even more challenging works.

    The best part of this Summer Reading List, of course, is that there will be no grades. :>) I hope you find a new book that tempts you to charge up your e-Reader or visit your local library and settle in for a good summer read. And please, help this list grow by adding your favorites in the comments.

    Happy Summer Reading!

    Photo Op: That's our descendant in the photo holding a copy of my book How to Archive Family Keepsakes. He makes a good poster boy for reading any book any time of year.

    Sunday
    Jul212013

    Orange County Summers ca. 1960

    What's Are You Doing for Summer Vacation?

    La habra library

    I remember when the big question during the final weeks of the school year was always the same, "So, whatareyoudoingforsummervacation?"

    "Nuthin'"

    My friends were carted off on exotic camping vacations to Yellowstone, or spent weeks visiting relatives in Omaha. Hardly anyone I knew went to summer school; it seemed mostly for kids who had to make up classes after they were out for weeks with mono, or for anyone who had the misfortune to flunk chemistry.

    Summer in Orange County, California was hot, smoggy, and wonderfully dull. My mom planned just enough activities to keep us out of trouble (so she thought), and the rest of our days were spent playing with friends, reading, and inventing stuff in the backyard. With four years between us, my sister may remembers those days differently, but I loved the gift of freedom and the challenge "Girls, go find something to do."

    B-O-R-E is a Four Letter Word

    Summers were never boring. We spent days building elaborate Barbie houses and then whined because we ran out of time to play with them. On hot afternoons, we kneeled in the dirt along the shady side of the house and collected iron filings. What do you do with iron filings? I don't know, but they're cool.

    As a pre-teen I babysat for neighbors, ironed hankies for pocket money, and was the driving force behind a variety of start-up businesses. We sold lemonade, lemons, and avocados. We printed out a newspaper using an office mimeograph master and a tray of Knox gelatin. We put on plays, talent shows, and musicals.

    The 60's were good years to keep teenagers busy. I have more memories of psychedelic sunsets at scout camp than I do of concerts and music. Our groovy skits provided campfire entertainment and the best camp crafts were candles and love-beads.

    The activities changed with the years, from iron filings to scout camp to camp counselor, but one annual event remained as popular when I was 15 as when I was 5 -- the public library summer reading program.

    Every June the public library promoted summer reading with a themed program filled with contests and activities. It was the best part of summer for a nerdy girl who loved to read. The only problem was the 10 book limit on how many titles you could check out. Ten books is hardly enough when you are whipping through the Bobbsey Twins, Cherry Ames, and Nancy Drew series.

    I haven't collected iron filings in a long time, but I still see summer as a time to try something new and to read my way through the heat. I mark the end of the school year with my own list of summertime goals, although goals is too business-like to suit the mood of summer. Dreams would be better. Summertime is dream-time. A time to master a new skill, discover a new talent, or read a new book.

    This summer I'm working my way through a stack of new books, learning to make my step-mom's Texas fried chicken, and working through Dr. Tom Jones' Mastering Genealogical Proof. Oh, and I'm going returning to the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP), or Genealogy Camp as I've heard it called.

    "So, whatareyoudoingforsummervacation?"

    Tuesday
    Jul162013

    On the Road with Gena and Jean's Genealogy Tour

    Two ladies sitting in motor car museum of hartlepool flickr the commons

    Don't you love the theme photo at Gena and Jean's Genealogy Journey Blog?
    Museum of Hartlepool. Flickr the Commons

    Gena Philibert-Ortega and Jean Wilcox Hibben are on the road this month lecturing on genealogy and social history, and sharing their new books. This week Gena and Jean have appearances in Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley before driving up the Pacific coast to stop off in Santa Barbara. Next week, the pair will be speaking in Sacramento. 

    The complete tour schedule is posted on their tour blog, Gena and Jean's Genealogy Journey. The concept of a genealogy book tour is a unique idea, and contributions from tour sponsors will  help to defray Gena and Jean's travel expenses.

    Gena is the author of From the Family Kitchen: Discover Your Food Heritage and Preserve Favorite Recipes  and a popular speaker and prolific writer on women and social history topics. Gena blogs about cookbooks, recipes, and all kinds of cool stuff at her blogs Gena's Genealogy and Food. Family. Ephemera.

    Gena and Jean are long-time friends and are both active in the Association of Professional Genealogists and other national and local genealogy organizations

    Jean is a Board Certified genealogist with a special interest in folk music and a new historical novel chronicling the story of her great great grandmother, Elisabeth.  Jean writes about her projects and research at Circlemending.

    Jean is also the lead researcher for the upcoming PBS television program Genealogy Roadshow.Gena and Jean also plan to make a stop in San Francisco to be on-site for the Genealogy Roadshow filming in San Francisco.

    Everyone who attends their presentations is in for a treat. Check out the schedule and follow their adventures on their genealogy journey.

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