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    In every family, someone ends up with “the stuff.” It is the goal of The Family Curator to inspire, enlighten, and encourage other family curators in their efforts to preserve and share their own family treasures.

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    Monday
    Jun102013

    5 New Things I Learned at #SCGS2013 Jamboree Including New Data on the Hockey Gene

    . . . and a few wild and crazy discoveries about my genealogy friends.

    Nextgen meetup

    Next Gen MeetUp at Jamboree #SCGS2013 

    1. The Genealogy Generation Gap Has Been Zapped!

    The Chart Chick Janet Hovorka is really on to something with her new book, Zap the Grandma Gap -- If you didn't know it already, genealogy has become a multi-generational passion, and a look around the Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree conference proves it!

    The exact numbers haven't been released, but as a long-time Jamboree attendee, I could see that Y- and Z-generation Jamboree attendees, speakers, and exhibitors were present in greater numbers than ever before at the 2013 event.

    The 2013 Student Genealogy Grant recipient Mike Savoca was a first-time Jamboree attendee, but he found plenty of student-company with Elyse Doerflinger, Anthony Ray, Mike Melendez, and other young genealogists.

    The new NextGen Genealogy Network held a standing-room only virtual meet-up organized by Elyse to introduce Jamboree to NextGen organizers. 

    A look 'round the exhibit hall showed new faces with new products, too. Treelines' Tammy Hepps was on hand to show off her online new story-telling software after winning the Developer's Prize at RootsTech 2013.

    2. Genetic Genealogy is HOT!

    Everyone was talking about the DNA Day held as a pre-conference event on Thursday, June 6. Each session sounded better than the last, featuring respected scholars and researchers presenting on various aspects of genetic genealogy.

    I was sorry to miss this event, but will be sure to catch it if there is an encore next year! You know a conference is good when the audio-visual recording staff is still talking about it two days later.

    Blog summit paul hawthorne

    Bloggers' Summit, Host Thomas MacEntee; 
    from left Paula Stuart-Warren, Judy G. Russell, Denise Levenick, CeCe Moore
    (photo courtesy J. Paul Hawthorne) 

    3. Genealogy Blogging is Not Going Away

    I was privileged to join Paula Stuart-Warren, CeCe Moore, Judy G. Russell at the Bloggers' Summit moderated by GeneaBloggers' Thomas MacEntee. This annual event is a touchpoint for genealogy bloggers and gives a good sense of how we got where we are and what to look for in the future.

    With over 3,000 genealogy blogs currently listed at the GeneaBloggers website, it's clear that blogging has found an audience in the genealogy community. You'd think that everyone was reading genealogy blogs, but in reality, I heard a comment after the summit that only about 10% of genealogists regularly read blogs. If that figure is correct, a lot of family historians are missing out on some great resources.

    Although each panelist admitted that there just isn't time enough to read all the blogs we'd like to cover, no one saw blogs diminishing in popularity anytime soon. In fact, one of the first questions from the audience was about starting a genealogy blog.

    4. Genealogy Can Be Really Really Funny

    Dan Poffenberger's presentation at the Sunday morning scholarship breakfast was the best early-morning wake-up call I've heard in a long time. He gave a VERY humorous look at some of the actual records he's found along his research career, including pre-cradle to post-grave excerpts of parish registers, census records, wills, and other documents. Dan also revealed a hint of what it's like growing up with an unusual surname.

    5. Researching the "Hockey Gene"

    Inquiring minds wanted to know: Is "hockey love/obsession/passion" acquired or inherited? So, I went to the best source I know for All Things Hockey: Rhonda R. McClure (aka "nationally  recognized genealogist and lecturer on New England, immigration and naturalization, Italian, German, institutional, fraternal and computerized genealogy. . ."). 

    Rhonda's name pops up frequently as a genealogy lecturer, and nearly as often on Facebook cheering on her ice-favorites. I figured she was the go-to resource for this specialized research query.

    The question: "How did you become interested (read: obsessed) with ice hockey?"

    Her answer: "I'm from New Hampshire."

    So, there you have it. Geographic Genetics. 

    Tweetables --

     

    Wednesday
    Jun052013

    Meet Mr. Curator at #SCGS2013 Jamboree: Vintage Treasure Chest Thursday

    DanOldGreen

    We sold the truck, but Mr. Curator is still in the picture!

    Come by and say "Hello" at the Family Tree Magazine booth VM003 at the Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree in Burbank, Calirfornia Friday through Sunday, June 7-9. I will be signing my book, How to Archive Family Keepsakes all weekend, and Mr. Curator will be helping out on Sunday.

    Bring your family heirloom, archiving, and organizing questions for a free consultation, and plan to attend the presentations on organizing and preserving family keepsakes --

    Paper or Plastic: Preserving Family Keepsakes is a 90-minute hand-on workshop that will include lecture, demonstration, and plenty of archival storage samples for your examination. SU019 10:00 am to 11:30 am.

    Lessons from the Archive is a traditional lecture-presentation, and will be Live-Streamed to home viewers. This session will highlight dos and don'ts for working with inherited collections, and specific case study examples from my home archives. You must pre-register to view the Live-Streamed session by signing-up HERE. SU029 2:30 pm to 3:30 pm.

    See you there!

     

    Wednesday
    Jun052013

    Touchy Feely Time with Archival Boxes and Folders at #SCGS13

    6 alpha trunk new

    Join me at the Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree to get up close and personal with the most popular archival storage products -- and a few new surprises in preservation containers -- for Paper or Plastic? Preserving Keepsakes Workshop on Sunday, June 9th.

    I am especially excited to be showing off some new-to-me (and maybe to you) products from Hollinger Metal Edge and Sentry Safe. Both companies were kind enough to send me sample products and a lot of great information to share with attendees. I will also have a limited number of archival product catalogs available from Hollinger Metal Edge.

    This 90-minute workshop could also be called "Everything I Wish I Had Known When I Inherited My First Family Collection." We will discuss how to safely preserve an assortment of family artifacts, including documents, correspondence, photographs, and artifacts, and attendees will have a chance to see and handle a selection of archival storage containers.

    Paper or Plastic will begin with a presentation highlighting 

    • What Makes It an Heirloom?
    • Roles and Goals for Collectors
    • Archives 101
    • Preservation Case Studies
    • Make It Yourself Archival Options

    Following the presentation, there will be time for product demonstrations and questions, and hand-on with the sample products.

    When I first inherited my grandmother's treasures, I was overwhelmed by the huge assortment of archival storage boxes. Should I use an upright box or a flat box? Drop front or telescoping lid? Is there a difference between grey archival board and black or tan? It took hours to unravel the mysteries of the catalog and finally begin to move my keepsakes into appropriate storage. I hope Sunday's presentation will cut through the infusion and help you organize and preserve your family treasures.

    Sunday, June 7 10:00am - 11:30 am SCGS Jamboree
    Paper or Plastic? Preserving Keepsakes Workshop

    Attendees will find a 4-page handout in the Jamboree Syllabus and a Workshop Worksheet to use during the session on the Jamboree App (look in the Exhibitor listing under The Family Curator for the downloads).

    Thursday
    May302013

    Lessons from the Family Archive: Streamed from SCGS Jamboree

    I Inherited the Stuff

    Are you scratching your head over what to do first with your inherited family keepsakes? Wondering how to save your treasures from damage without breaking the bank? Join me Sunday afternoon June 9th for Lessons from the Archive streamed live from the Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree in Burbank, California. 

    I am excited to be presenting one of the fourteen live-streamed events from the SCGS Jamboree as part of JamboStream, sponsored by Ancestry.com. You must be pre-registered to view the sessions, and you must register for each individual session you with to attend. Click here for the complete schedule and registration information.

    I inherited my first BIG family archive from my grandmother about 2000. Everything had been stored in an old trunk for decades, and was moved into cardboard beer boxes by the time it came to me. Gradually, I moved the letters, photos, newspapers, and documents into archival storage boxes and started scanning individual items.

    Then, another relative passed away and their treasures came home with me.

    And another.

    And another.

    Along the way I've picked up a few tips that have helped me keep my sanity and keep things organized. The biggest lesson learned is certainly 

    Maintain Order in the Archive -- keep collections together and avoid orphan heirlooms.

    I will be sharing some of my favorite tips and photos from my own inherited treasures at Sunday's presentation. Sign up here to join in from home, and feel free to come back and leave any comments or questions.

    Thursday
    May302013

    Aprons from Auntie's Hope Chest for Treasure Chest Thursday

    Easy pie apron

    It's "Easy as Pie" to see that these handmade vintage aprons were made to be admired. My aunt received nearly two dozen aprons for her wedding shower in 1958 and carefully packed them away in her cedar hope chest with the hand-embroidered pillowcases, sheets, and towels. When my sister and I opened the chest two years ago, everything was still in the original paper but marked with the folds of time.

    These two aprons are my favorites. "Easy as Pie" is made with a printed kitchen towel as the center panel design surrounded by cheery yellow cotton. "Flower Garden" (on the right) is made by joining crocheted flowers to form a colorful border around a plain mesh dishcloth. The flower pocket adds another splash of color.

    Of course, sometimes a new bride wants to look frilly and pretty. That's when she brings out the nylon and lace aprons:

    Nylon lace apron

    Pink nylon (now turned brown with age) adds a pretty touch to the pink floral cotton. The lavender nylon and lace would look dainty over a plain dress or skirt.

    And, when there's work to do, the 1950's woman will turn to practical attire like these simple cotton aprons:

    Work aprons

    It's unfortunate that the cotton discolored with time, but both the flower print and blue check would have been cheery and washable coverings for everyday housework and cooking. It (almost) makes me want to wash the dishes!

    Saturday
    May252013

    With Gratitude for Their Service

    US Navy Seaman Tustin Lighter Than Air Base

    U.S. Navy Seaman 2nd Class Edwin May (from left),
    with Seaman Gilbert, Seaman Noren, and Commander MacCubbin.
    Lighter Than Air Base in Tustin, California, January 1955.
    (Official Photograph U.S. Navy.)

    Corp. W.G. May Camp Funston

    Corp. Walter G. May, U.S. Army, Camp Funston
    1917

    Col. M.N. Levenick, U.S. Army

    Col. Maynard N. Levenick, U.S. Army

    Thursday
    May232013

    Treasure Chest Thursday: Vintage Postcards Picture the History of Decoration Day

    First There Was Decoration Day

     

    This 1909 Decoration Day postcard depicts a U.S. Army vet, sabre in hand to salute his fallen comrades. The Grand Army of the Republic, as the Union Army was known, is celebrated in the five-star membership badge of the G.A.R.

    According to a 1910 history of the G.A.R, the badge was "struck from captured Confederate cannon" and the bronze "issued to the G.A.R. by the War Department as needed."

    The design includes motifs representing charity, liberty, loyalty, and fraternity surrounded by the insignia of the various branches of service -- bugle (infantry), crossed cannons (artillery), crossed muskets (marines), crossed sabers (cavalry), and anchor (sailors).

    The design was adopted in 1866, revised in 1868 and again in 1869. A few changes were made again in 1873 and 1886. This postcard dates from 1909 per the postmark, and probably shows the latest medal design.

    Shortly after the conclusion of the Civil War, communities began commemorating the fallen soldiers by decorating graves with flowers. General John A. Logan of the Grand Army of the Republic proclaimed the first major observance May 30, 1868, held at Arlington National Cemetery where both Union and Confederate graves were decorated.

    The same fascination with symbolism that created the G.A.R. medal is evident in the postcard design in these examples. 

     

    In this illustration a young child, probably a granddaughter, slips a flower in the lapel of her grandfather. He wears the G.A.R. veteran medal on his coat near the pinned sleeve, silent testament to his loss in the war. 

    In the bottom left of the card is an artist's version of the famous battle in March 1862 between the first iron-clad warships, the USS Monitor and the CSS Virginia. The battle ended in a stalemate, but introduced a new phase of warfare to America. 

    This postcard obviously continues the series shown above, but the painterly scene on this card recalls the infantry's efforts in the war, in the same way that the previous card depicted naval war maneuvers. Presumably, other cards in the series pay homage to other branches of service. It would be interesting to locate other cards in the series and see the entire set together.

    The main image shows a war widow (note the grandmother's photo cameo brooch) with her grandson who playing at being a soldier. He wears a miniature G.A.R. medal, a too-large belt, and is holding his grandfather's saber. 

    And Then There Was Memorial Day

    This Memorial Day card bears a postmark on the reverse of 1908; it seems that the holiday was known by both names. The images here are probably meant to depict the new and old Navy warships. The card sends "Memorial Day Greetings" rather than a message for "Decoration Day," although the term Memorial Day did not become official until 1966.

    I found these cards at a local Vintage Paper and Ephemera Show in Southern California. If you love family history, and haven't discovered these shows yet, you are missing out!

    Sources:

    Naval History and Heritage

    The Grand Army Badge

    This Day in History

    Wednesday
    May222013

    Roundup for Memorial Day FREE Record Access for Researchers

    Block out a few hours and take advantage of these great offers for free access to U.S. military records this weekend.

    My Heritage Free Access to US Military Records

    Myheritage memorial day

    Researchers can take advantage on one week of free access May 21-28 to the MyHeritage U.S. military record collection. Available databases include 

    • U.S. WW II Army Enlistment
    • Service Records of Confederate Soldiers
    • WW II Reserve Corps Records
    • Air Force Register Extracts
    • US WW II Prisoners of War 194101946
    • Vietnam Casualties 1956 - 1998 
    • US Army Casualties 1961 - 1981
    • Korrean War Casualties 1950 - 1957
    • and more

    If you've been curious about MyHeritage, this would be great time to check out the website and database collection. I especially like the clean fresh design that makes the search form easy to see and understand.

    Fold3 Offers Free Access to New USCT Service Records

    Fold3 badge

    Compiled military service records of the United States Colored Troops (USCT) including over 3.6 million images is now available at Fold3.com through a partnership between Folde and the National Archives. Access to this collection is a free through May 31st.

    Available records include images scanned directly from documents as well as those digitized from microfilm. The collection consists of images for:

    • 1st through 1389th USCT Infantry
    • 1st gthrough 6th USCT Cavalry
    • USCT Artillery
    Read more about the collection and highlighted records at the Fold3 blog. American Veterans and their families are also eligible for a 50% discount on a Fold3 membership. More information is available here at the Fold3 website.

    FindMyPast Offers Free Access to US and International Military Records

    Findmypast-memday
     
    In honor of Memorial Day and Military Appreciation Month, Findmypast.com is making their U.S. and International military records available free Friday May 24 through Monday May 27. 
     
    Records include:
    • American Prisoners of Korean War, 1950-1953
    • Korean War Casualty File
    • Korean War Deaths, 1950-1954
    • United States, World War One (WWI) Draft Registration Cards,1917-1918
    • US Army Casualty File, 1961-1981
    • Vietnam War Casualties
    • Vietnam War Casualties Returned Alive
    • Vietnam War Deaths
    • World War II Army Enlistment Records
    • World War II POWs
    • and international military record collection
    The Findmypast.com Blog also features a series of great infographics from MyMilitaryBase.com about U.S. military families.

    Disclosure: I received a complimentary subscription to MyHeritage, but have no obligation to favorably review the website.

    Wednesday
    May222013

    Wordless Wednesday: Can You Identify This Military Unit?

    This image was digitized from a negative found in my grandmother's trunk of old photos and documents. The date and place are unidentified, but it seems to be part of a series of photos that may have been taken in Texas. Any ideas what these young men might be up to?

    I first discovered this photograph in 2008 and wrote about it in Treasure Revealed! but I'm no closer to knowing more about the picture today than I was then. Any ideas?

    Monday
    May202013

    Don't Miss #SCGS13 Jamboree

    Geneabloggers Lisa Alzo and Thomas MacEntee always have a great time at Jamboree!

    Early Bird Registration Closes 24 May

    You still have time to register for the upcoming Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree in Burbank June 7-9, and the Family History and DNA Day on Thursday, June 6. Jamboree gets bigger and better with something new each year.

    The 2013 conference will kick-off Thursday with Family History and DNA: Genetic Genealogy in 2013 featuring Spencer Wells, PhD. and Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Then, on Friday, the 44th Annual SCGS Genealogy Jamboree will open with 50 speakers, 70 exhibitors, and 150 sessions.

    Join us for the Sunday morning Scholarship Breakfast where I will introduce Michael Savoca,  recipient of the 2013 Suzanne Winsor Freeman Student Genealogy Grant. Jamboree is Mike's first national conference -- be sure to say "Hi" when you see him in June.

    Register soon to take advantage of the Early Bird pricing!

     

    Randy Seaver and Angel Linda will be there too! 

    Tuesday
    May142013

    Hitting the Jackpot at #NGS2013

    Ten Tweets to Richmond

     

    With Mystery Judge Gena Philibert-Ortega
    (photo courtesy Randy Seaver and Kathryn Doyle) 

    The NGS Las Vegas Twitter Challenge was a fun event encouraging attendees to tweet as they completed ten (fairly challenging) tasks throughout the conference week. Each task required a photo and inclusion of the official challenge hashtag #ngs2013hunt, as well as the challenge number. In addition, participants were encouraged to incorporate the conference theme -- Building New Bridges -- in some way.

    Rather than a blind drawing for all participants, the "most creative and innovative entry overall" would be selected as the winner by a secret judge. Whew! 

    With encouragement of my genealogy blogging friends, I managed to complete all ten tasks AND be present for the announcement of the winner. It was a good thing Kathryn Doyle was keeping up on all the news, because my car was packed and I was nearly headed home early for Mom's Day when I got her message to stick around for the final announcement.

    Gena Philibert-Ortega was revealed to be the mystery judge and announced the winners -- Holly Simmons and Denise Levenick! Woo-hoo. Looks like I'll be headed to Richmond next spring. Thank you VERY MUCH NGS!

    #NGS2013Hunt Twitterstream

    Genealogy Dress Code: Hard Hats Required (kilt wearers exempt)! #NGS2013hunt Challenge1 http://t.co/edeCrE8zVI

     

    No lunchbox & thermos needed at the BCG luncheon. #NGS2013hunt challenge 2 with Diane Gravel & Joan Peake. http://t.co/wylzzoWQ3t

     Checking out new tools for building bridges w/NGS publications. #NGS2013hunt Challenge#3. http://t.co/DXRKHPIDjh 

    Found a helpful NGS Ask Me volunteer who fixed my specs without any tools! thanks Lenny! #NGS2013hunt Challenge 4 http://t.co/B7upZJ8wXR

    #NGS2013 Exhibit Hall buzzing.Talked w/Treelines about gr8 new tool to build bridges betwn now/then. #NGS2013hunt #5 http://t.co/9rN2903Xqx

     

    Spreadsheet as #genealogy tool for building bridges to ancestors' past w Jill Crandall #NGS2013hunt Geek Chlng 6 http://t.co/pXeT7iILd9

    Yes, it's Vegas, Baby for #NGS2013. Ready to build new bridges. #NGS2013hunt Challenge 7 http://t.co/Plx35KGDpV

    @walkingyourtree wins longest #NGS2013 badge WOW! She could build a bridge with those ribbons! #NGS2013hunt clue 8 http://t.co/8NsSdT2VrD

    Networking about building bridges with Pam Eagleson & Stefani Evans for #NGS2013hunt challenge #9 http://t.co/WgbkK2Qzfk

    Rubbing shoulders w/ NGS celeb Laura deGrazia, she knows the best tools for NY Research #NGS2013hunt Challenge 10 http://t.co/QPAYAA7aHl

    Monday
    May132013

    Day 4 Highlights and Photos from #NGS2013

    NGS 2

    So, what's with the construction hat?

    When word went out from NGS about the conference Twitter Challenge, I decided to join the spirit of the event by tweeting the ten tasks for a chance to win registration to the NGS 2014 Conference in Richmond, Virginia. Part of the challenge was to incorporate the conference theme in each tweet; the hat seemed appropriate for Building New Bridges and my grandson didn't seem to miss it from the toy box.

    Stay tuned for a recap of the challenge contest and more photos!

    Exhibit Hall Highlights

    I usually spend quite a bit of conference time in the exhibit hall checking out new services and products, but this time it was hard to find time between sessions and meet-ups to walk the aisles of the hall. I finally scheduled some time Saturday to see what's new. 

    Author Christy Leskovar

    I met author Christy Leskovar (right) with her mom and chatted about her new family history books, One Night in a Bad Inn  and Finding the Bad Inn: Discovering My Family's Hidden Past .

    Polish Mission

    Cecile Wendt Jensen and Dr. Hal Learman of the Polish Mission in Detroit, Michigan gave me a brief introduction to Polish geography! Now I know where to turn when I start working seriously on my Pomeranian and Prussian lines. Cecile's introductory book Sto Lat: A Modern Guide to Polish Genealogy looks like it will be a big help!

    Treelines

    Snapped this photo with Tammy of Treelines online timeline software as part of the NGS Tweet Challenge. Can't wait to give this program a test-drive. They won the Developer's Award at Roots Tech.

    Monday
    May132013

    Sherlock Holmes for MyHeritage at NGS2013

     

    Here I am with Sherlock Holmes and Daniel Horowitz of MyHeritage
    at the Press Conference announcing the new Record Detective feature
    of the research software.
     

    MyHeritage Announces the Record Detective

    Saturday morning I attended the MyHeritage press conference where Daniel Horowitz announced the newest feature of the software program, the Record Detective. In a clever play with the name, Holmes' costumed assistants met attendees in the hallway with the query, "Are you seeking a clue?" The direction to the second floor conference room was helpful, and the team continued with the theme in the introduction, press packet, and fun detective mustaches.

    Record Detective is a record and people matching feature that seeks out material from the MyHeritage databases to help expand research and trees. It allows users to review, and extract information to add to their own research and works on both public and private trees.

    I'm looking forward to trying it out and will post more info. Check out Randy Seaver's notes at Genea-Musings for his overview and view the video introduction on YouTube:

     

    Sunday
    May122013

    NGS 2013 Vegas Day 3: It's All in the Details

    It's becoming a challenge to continue my rather abbreviated summary of presentations at the National Genealogical Society Conference in Las Vegas. As I thought about what key lesson tied together the sessions I attended on Friday, the theme became obvious -- it was all in the details, or as Elizabeth Shown Mills emphasized "a researcher is a nitpicker."

    Here are a few notes on my schedule for the day:

    J. Mark Lowe -- Bible Thumper or Pious Pilgrim: Relgious Ancestors on the Frontier
    I wish my Bible Church ancestors left more detailed records (heck, I wish they left church records, at ALL!)
    Mark Lowe's description of the rich records in some denominations made me long for converts in my family tree. 

    Elizabeth Shown Mills -- Trousers, Beds, Black Domestic, Tacks and Housekeeping Bills: "Trivial Details" Can Solve Research Problems!
    Be a nitpicker with details.
    THINK long and hard and every which way about the information you find. Details hide answers to tough questions. 

    Jill Crandall -- Microsoft Excel: A Little-Known Genealogy Research Tool
    Excel wasn't designed for historical detail. 
    Jill Crandall makes a good case for using spreadsheets to analyze data, but I still find it easier to use tables and charts. Sorry! I DID learn, however, that you have to do some gymnastics if you want Excel to recognize dates before 1 Jan 1900 on a PC (190? on a Mac).

    Dr. Tom Jones -- Planning "Reasonably Exhaustive" Research
    Detail, Detail, Detail
    I seem to be on the methodology and Skillbuilding Tracks and the lessons to plan, document, and analyze are creating a refrain. Dr. Jones makes this task seem very do-able and not nearly as intimidating as it sounds.  

    I'm working up a list of JAMB recordings to purchase because there are so many enticing lectures I want to attend running concurrently. I noticed that JAMB is also selling 4-CD sets of lectures by Paula Stuart Warren, John Humphrey, Elizabeth Shown Mills, and Dr. Tom Jones. Worth checking out!

    Friday
    May102013

    Lessons of the Day #ngs2013

    If Day One was all about Lies, the theme for the sessions I attended Thursday must be Control

    The day starts early here in the desert, and it's really the best time to see the morning light over the mountains ringing the Las Vegas valley. I discovered a route from my hotel room in a distant tower that takes me outside along the front of the hotel directly to the doors of the conference foyer. Tradeoff: casino lights for sunlight.

    Here's a brief recap of my Day Two sessions:

    Pam Stone Eagleson -- Grandma's Treasure Chest: Investigating and Evaluating Family Artifacts
    Control the Citation. 
    [Bonus lesson: Photo captions lie; This lecture was at the top of my list after I met Pam at GRIP 2012 and discovered we have a common fascination with family artifacts. She shared items from her own collection with solid ideas for researching, citing, and establishing provenance of keepsakes. Her sample misleading photo caption attracted lots of comments following the talk and makes me rethink some photos in my own collection.]

    Barbara Vines Little -- Feme Covert or Feme Sole: Women and the Law
    Control Women.
    [well, that seems to be the goal of English Common Law. Barbara Little always manages to make a history lesson funny, informative, and VERY enjoyable. I think the women left this session rather happy to be living in 2012.] 

    Judy Russell -- Blackguards and Black Sheep: The Lighter Side of the Law (BCG Luncheon)
    Un-Controlable Ancestors Left Awesome Records.
    What's to add? The Legal Genealogist IS a treat not to be missed! 

    Elizabeth Shown Mills -- Information Overload? Effective Project Planning, Research, Data Management, and Analysis
    Control the Information.
    [I have been waiting months to hear this lecture in person after reading about it from earlier conferences. It was packed with useful tips for building a solid information management workflow. Highly recommended for anyone struggling to find a "better" way to handle mountains of data. P.S. Dust off your word-processing software]. 

    Patricia Walls Stamm and Jordan Jones -- NGS American Genealogy Home Study Course
    New Edition Under Control.
    If you have been considering enrolling in the NGS Home Study Course, you might want to get an update on plans for a revised edition coming (hopefully) later this year. Stay tuned for a more complete recap of this session.

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