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    In every family, someone ends up with “the stuff.” It is the goal of The Family Curator to inspire, enlighten, and encourage other family curators in their efforts to preserve and share their own family treasures.

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    Tuesday
    Jul162013

    Heir Apparent Learns How to Preserve Family Keepsakes

      

    Meet David. He's not quite two years old, but he knows it's important to take good care of your Blankie.

    When David has a question about preserving family keepsakes he turns to How to Archive Family Keepsakes for straightforward advice on storage methods and techniques. 

    Some folks want to throw Blankie under his stroller, other people want to stuff him in the diaper bag (phewwww!). David learned that Blankie, like all textiles, is happiest when he's put away nice and clean and stored in a cool place away from heat, light, and moisture. 

    Blankie isn't very big, so it will be easy to roll him in a clean white sheet and let him take a long nap on the closet shelf. One day. But right now, David has decided it's just fine to keep Blankie nearby. After all, Blankie IS a Family Keepsake.

    In Every Family, Somone Inherits "The Stuff."

    Order your copy How to Archive Family Keepsakes today, and learn how to care for and preserve textiles like Blankie, and all kinds of keepsakes --

    • antique and vintage photographs
    • slides and negatives
    • film and video
    • photo albums
    • scrapbooks
    • diaries and journals
    • Family Bibles
    • genealogy research materials
    • baby albums
    • yearbooks and bound books
    • art
    • furniture
    • china and glassware
    • collectibles
    • musical instruments
    • quilts and samplers
    • clothing
    • military insignia
    • uniforms
    • scouting memorabilia
    • watches and jewelry
    • metal tools
    • toys, dolls, games

    . . . including Hop Hop, David's toy stuffed frog.

    How to Archive Family Keepsakes is available in paperback and ebook editions from Amazon.comShopFamilyTree, iBooksBarnes and Noble, and retail booksellers.

        10% Off 

     

     

     

    Saturday
    Jul132013

    Unlocking Inspiration in Arline's Heirloom Photograph

    Kayli owl

    My New-Fashioned Old-Fashioned Photo Locket

    My grandmother loved lockets and photo jewelry, and I do too. My niece, Kayli Craig, crafted this new keepsake for me with specialty items as an Origami Owl Custom Jewelry Designer. The locket features a snap open glass case that can hold three-dimensional objects, including this photo of my grandmother Arline and a gold-tone heart frame I found in a box of her old jewelry. I think the little metal frame may once have held another photo in it's own locket. I selected the family tree charm as my own contribution.

    We don't know much about Arline's beautiful photograph. Other similar photos are dated about 1908 and look very similar, giving a clue that this may have been created about the same time. Arline would have been 18 years old.

    Arline 1 web

    Arline Allen Kinsel, ca. 1908-1910

    This same photo was also the inspiration for a custom-made porcelain doll commissioned by Arline's eldest daughter sometime in the 1970s. The doll is dressed in white cotton with an eyelet jacket and black velvet ribbons at the wrist. A faded bouquet of flowers is tucked into her waistband. All that is missing is the wonderful hat with the organza butterflies ready to take flight.

    Doll 2

    Time has not been kind to the Arline doll. She was displayed in a glass-front case for many years where the light and air stained her gown and the painted porcelain. Poor dolly.

    I'm enjoying my own 21st century memento of Arline, especially knowing that the photo inside the glass locket was printed from a digital image and the keepsake original is tucked away safely in an archival box.

    If you are interested in keepsake lockets, please contact my niece to learn about the different options and styles available, including silver, gold, or bronze-tone. She can be reached through her website www.trinketsandcharms.origamiowl.com.

    Official Disclosure: Of course, I do have to advise you that I am not under any undue pressure to ooohhhhh and ahhhhh over this piece of jewelry. I picked it out and paid for it myself because I like it! (And I'm pretty crazy about my niece too).

    Tuesday
    Jul092013

    Where to Store Long Group Photos or Banquet Prints: Treasure Chest Thursday

     

    Inter-Church Family Bible Conference Hume Lake Aug. 21-28 1948

    Now that you've successfully dehumidified all those lovely old documents and long group photos that were held in tightly rolled little batons, you must be looking for a suitable archival-quality storage container. Right?

    You will want to store your photos and documents lying flat, and if you have multiple photos or documents it's a good idea to place a sheet of archival paper between each item. 

    The best storage choice is an acid-free, lignin-free archival box purchased from a reputable preservation supplier. These companies sell only archival quality products and their biggest customers are libraries, archives, and other institutions.

    You may find inexpensive boxes labeled "archival," but unless the tag also reads "Acid-free" and possibly "Lignin-free," it is not a true archival product. Confused? You are not alone.

    Why "Archival" Is Not Always Archival

    Unfortunately, the word "archival" is used freely by manufacturers to describe ANY container intended to store stuff. The word itself has no legal qualification. It's a bit like the word "organic." 

    Remember in the early days of the natural food movement when anyone and everyone called their produce "organic"? In 1990s, the government decided to lay down some ground rules; and today, when you see "certified organic" carrots you can be assured that those orange vegetables meet certain USDA standards. 

    It's much the same with archival products. Anyone can call a photo box "archival." After all, the box may be designed to "archive" or "store" photos. While there may come a time when the industry offers "certified archival" products that meet certain standards, for now, just know that the best storage containers for family keepsakes are labeled as acid-free, lignin-free (or low-lignin) containers.

    Where to Find True "Archival" Storage Boxes

    I'm often asked where to purchase archival storage boxes, and I have to confess that I'm a great believer in not re-inventing the wheel. When I want to purchase something new, I look for recommendations from people I trust. I feel very comfortable purchasing archival suppliers from the same manufacturer who supplies The Library of Congress and The National Archives. And, I'm not just playing favorites because this same company was kind enough to sponsor my Preserving Keepsakes Workshop at the recent Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree. 

    For at least 15 years, my go-to archival supplier has been Hollinger Metal Edge, with locations in Virginia and Southern California. Hollinger offers museum-quality archival products in all shapes and sizes, from photo to document to keepsake storage.

    Those long rolled photos we've been working with are sometimes called "banquet photos," presumably because so many images were made of convention and conference banquet attendees. Look for long shallow boxes called "Banquet Photo Storage" or  "Group Photo Boxes." You may have to order in quantities of three or more, so find a friend or someone in your genealogical society who will share an order with you.

    Banquet Photo Boxes

    Banquetbox

    Hollinger banquet boxes measure  24 x 12 1/2 x 2-inches and cost under $20 per box. Mylar protective sleeves and archival folders sized to fit individual prints are also available. 

    Other archival suppliers may offer similar storage boxes; just be careful to purchase true archival-quality containers. Look for acid-free, lignin free boxes.

    DIY Options?

    You may not want to invest in archival boxes right now; maybe you'd like to find someone to split that order with you. Or, maybe you have only one or two prints and plan to have them framed in the near future.

    A DIY archival folder will also protect your newly-flattened print from dust and light. You will need a sheet of heavy-weight archival board, about the weight of good card stock. Simply fold the board in half, and place your print inside. Use scrapbook tape to close the ends and store the folder on a shelf or on top of archival boxes. Be careful not to put items on top of the folder that might cause abrasions on the image, and plan to move the prints to more secure storage as soon as possible.

    Archival board is often available at art supply and framing stores. Look for acid-free, lignin-free board.

    Where to Store Your Banquet Photo Boxes

    Family keepsakes benefit from kind storage. Place your boxes in a location where you live and the temperature is fairly constant -- not too hot, or too cold. An empty closet or cupboard in your home is a good spot. Avoid humidity, dust, light, pests, and smoke or fumes. 

    For more ideas on locating your home archive and preserving different kinds of family treasures, check out my book How to Archive Family Keepsakes: Learn How to Preserve Family Photos, Memorabilia and Genealogy Records available in paperback, or the Kindle ebook excerpt How to Organize Inherited Items .

    See Also:

    Photo Tutorial: How to Relax and Rehumidify Old Rolled Photographs

    Official Disclosure: At my request, Hollinger Metal Edge provided an assortment of archival products for display and demonstration in my workshop at the 2013 SCGS Jamboree. I was not required to promote or endorse their products. I receive a small commission from sales when customers indicate FAMILYCURATOR in the coupon code box. I also recieve a small commision through sales at Amazon and Family Tree Books.

    Tuesday
    Jul092013

    Photo Tutorial: How to Relax and Rehumidify Old Rolled Photographs and Documents


     

    NOTE:  This article and the images are protected by copyright. PLEASE DO NOT copy and paste to your own website, blog, or newsletter.

    If you've ever tried to capture a family photo with everyone smiling at the same time, you know the exquisite torture of group photography. Some wise-guy pulls the rabbit-ears trick at the last minute, or crosses his eyes, or yanks someone's hair. That's why I love those long tightly-rolled panorama photos often found cast aside in family collections. You can usually spot a goofy grin, a secret wink or a wayward hand. It's a second of social history captured by lens and film.

    It's obvious that people don't quite know what to do with these old rolled photos. They resist exploration. When forced flat, the paper often cracks every few inches damaging the photograph. If you try to look at the photo a few inches at a time, carefully handling the paper as though you were reading an ancient scroll, it's hard to get the "big picture" of what's going on.

    This 1929 black-and-white panorama photo is a classic example of what can happen when a brittle rolled photograph is forcibly flattened without first reconditioning the paper; the print is cracked at regular intervals across the entire image.

    I inherited nearly a dozen long group photos from the 1920s through 1960s, most still rolled tight and in good condition. I really wanted to flatten the photos and examine them more closely for genealogical clues to my family history. If nothing else, I thought they would look great framed and hanging on the wall.

    Fortunately, it's not difficult or expensive to relax, or re-humidify, a rolled photo or document.  When I asked Sally Jacobs, The Practical Archivist, if there was a safe method to flatten those old photos, she directed me to the instructions and reassured m:

    "Yes, It's Safe to Try This At Home"

    So I did.

    And it worked!

    The cracked photo shown above was curled in a series of small waves looked like a photographic washboard. Because it was already damaged, I thought it would be a good item to use in my first experiment with the rehumidification process. 

    Since then, I have successfully rehumidified and flattened many panorama photos, and some curled and brittle snapshots. Sally says that the process is also safe with documents, not just photos. Museums and archives create a similar humidification chamber when working with old documents. You don't need any fancy equipment, just a few household items and a bit of common sense about working with your family keepsakes. Here's the recommended method I used with success:

    Step-by-Step Instructions for Relaxing a Rolled Photograph

    You Will Need:
    • rolled or curled photograph
    • plastic tub or container -- deep enough to hold your rack and leave space between the rack and tub lid
    • rubber coated wire rack -- I used an expandable plate rack (you need a rack that is large enough to accommodate your item
    • water -- room temperature
    • archival blotting paper
    • wax paper or parchment paper from your kitchen (optional)

     

    Relax photo fc 1Step 1. Select Your Photograph

    For your first project, select a photo or document that is NOT a priceless heirloom. If you just want to practice this technique, you may be able to find an old rolled photo selling cheap at a thrift store. Most people throw them away (ouch) because they think they're past saving.

    Tap the print with your fingernail. Does it sound hard, like dry pasta? It should feel and sound different when the paper is dehumidified.

    Relax photo fc 2 

    Step 2. The Humidification Chamber

    Place the tub on a towel or rug on your floor in an out-of-the-way spot where you can leave it for a few days. Make sure the rack will fit inside the container and extend long enough to support your photograph. The rolled photo will start needing only a few inches of space, but as it relaxes you may want to gently help it unroll.

    Add about 2 inches of room temperature water. Do NOT use warm or hot water. You don't want  condensation on the underside of the lid that might drip down on to your photo. Use room temperature water.

    Place the rack inside the tub and place your photo on the rack. It will look lonely. 

    Relax photo fc 3

    Step 3. Close the Chamber

    Place the lid on the box and let it sit.

    Relax photo fc 4

    Step 4. Wait.

    Let everything sit there for a few hours. Get on with your life. Read a new blog.

    Relax photo fc 5

    Step 5. Check for Condensation 

    After about an hour, open the container and check  your photo. Make sure there is no moisture dripping on the photo. Feel the paper. Does it feel softer? It will probably need more time to absorb the moisture in the chamber.

    What we are doing here is making moisture available to the paper, so that it can become limber and flexible once again. You don't want too much moisture, because that can damage the print. It could also encourage the growth of mold or mildew. If you notice beads of water on the inside of the cover that could drip down on your print, wipe them off and check your print. Notice the moisture aroung the side walls of the chamber in the next photo. That's okay.

    Relax photo fc 6

    Step 6. Check Again

    After 4 or 5 hours, or overnight, check the paper again. Can you unroll it at all? You may need to do this a few times. Keep checking every few hours until the paper feels relaxed. Look at the difference between this photo and the tightly curled batons in the first step. You can feel the difference in the paper. Tap the print again with your fingernail. It should sound different; softer, more like. . . well, like paper.

    Relax photo fc 8

    Step 7. Remove Your Photo from the Chamber

    When you think the photo feels softer and flexible remove it from the box supporting it with both hands and place it on the blotting paper. Gently ease open the rolled image. If it resists or starts to crack, it needs more moisture. Return it to the humidification chamber.

    At some point the photo will have absorbed enough moisture to relax and allow you to unroll it. If the paper is still extremely brittle and hard you should probably stop and seek professional assistance. I have not experienced this situation.

    Relax photo fc 7

    At this point, your photo is relaxed. Now you need to allow it to dry as a flat print. If you have a  sheet of kitchen wax paper or kitchen paper, you can place this over the surface of the photo before folding the blotting paper over the top. It's not absolutely necessary. 

    Relax photo fc 9

    Step 8. Add Weight and Dry.

    Finally, weight down the entire photo in the blotting paper so that it dries flat. I used a heavy wooden cutting board topped with both volumes of the Compact Oxford English Dictionary  (the heaviest books on my shelves).

    Stitch gurley crop

    Step 9. Allow the Print to Completely Dry

    It may take a few days for your photograph to dry out completely. Check it occasionally. Remove the parchment paper and let the blotting paper absorb more moisture. Give it enough time to become very very flat.

    The result will be an heirloom group photograph you can scan, restore, share, frame, or use for further family history research.

    In a forthcoming post I'll show you how I scan panorama group photos with the Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and with the Epson Perfection V500 and use stitching software to recreate the original long image.

     

    Disclaimer: 

    This DIY project worked for me; but I can't guarantee you will have the same results. Please use caution and good judgement, and try it at your own risk.

    Monday
    Jul082013

    How Genealogy Plagiarism and Copyright Infringement Makes Everyone a Loser

    I hate being a “loser.” But I am, and so are you. And it makes me angry.

    Last week I spent two afternoons preparing a How To article for The Family Curator. The topic was suggested by questions on Facebook and Google+, and was something I’ve had in mind for some time, “How to Relax Old Rolled Photographs.” I wanted to offer a step-by-step photo tutorial on how to tackle this do-it-yourself project.

    To create the tutorial photos, I needed to stage my process at each step. It took a few hours to get out all the materials, set up the shots and take the pictures. Next, I had to move them to my computer, resize, tag, crop, and write the article. This one blog post took two full afternoons to prepare. 

    I was ready to publish the article on The Family Curator when I read about the court decision involving a longtime website and a relative newcomer, and the discussion that followed.

    Barry Ewell eMail #30 Remember the Power of One
    “Litigation Between Cyndi’s List and MyGenShare Dismissed”

    and Comments by:

    Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter

    Dear Myrtle: Is there such as thing as ethical plagiarism?

    Michael Hait: Copyright, plagiarism, and citing your sources 

    I’m a writer, first, and a genealogist second. I sell words, not research. I like blogging because it gives me a place to write, and I enjoy the response from readers. Every comment, whether at my blog or through email or Facebook is a kind of paycheck, the reward that makes me want to keep writing.

    I don’t want to earn a living blogging because I don’t want to spend my time analyzing conversion rates, SEO, campaign strategy, etc. 

    I just want to write. I write for magazines, other websites, newsletters, and all kinds of outlets, and often I am paid for the products I provide.  It may take a full week working part-time hours for me to draft, edit, create images, and send off a magazine article. Weeks later, I receive a check for the article.

    Some blog posts require more time, too, like the “How to” I’ve been working on. I have to set up materials for the photos, take the pictures, tag, resize, post to blog, write the article, and finally publish, hoping that readers find it useful (and maybe even leave a comment).

    So here’s where we all lose.

    I Lose

    As a writer and genealogy blogger I lose the claim of protected intellectual property.

    When I read about cases of plagiarism and copyright infringement where it’s unclear if an author has been able to defend his or her rights, I begin to think twice about what I write and post as free content on my own blog. After all, there is little guarantee that the same won’t happen to my content. I might turn on my computer  tomorrow and find that my “How to” article is behind a pay wall on a subscription website, or offered for sale under someone else’s name. Yes, I can demand that the material be removed, file a complaint, and state my legal rights, and I’ve done so in the past. But, the cold reality is that it keeps happening.

    If Content is King in blogging, but content cannot be protected, where does this leave the genealogy writer?

    Do we self-edit – only publishing on our blog what we are willing to lose and see appear under another by-line?

    Do we hold back “best stuff” to sell and post only reprints or non-marketable material?

    Do we spend so much time defending our intellectual property that we have less time to create new original material?

    You Lose

    We have an active and responsive genealogy blogging community. We talk to each other (a lot). But there are many more genealogists and family historians who are not bloggers and come to us for information, news, research tips, and know-how. They look for FREE first. And, that’s okay.

    If genealogy writers begin to revise their editorial practices and choice of content, where does that leave the genealogy reader?

    Less free original content

    Less free quality content

    Less content overall

    We all lose.

    Unless, writers and readers can work together to help maintain and protect intellectual property of the creators.

    Refuse to lose.

     

    • If you notice a breach of copyright on a website, PLEASE take time to notify the original author. Give the author a heads-up so they can take action to protect their work.
    • Always give credit where credit is due. Link to other blogs, use quotes, use citations, and ask permission before reposting someone else’s work, whether it’s a photo, an article, or a research conclusion.
    • Let writers know that you like the information they provide. Take time to “pay” for that free content with a quick comment, a Facebook “Like,” or Twitter RT.

     

    I’m not giving in, yet. Come back tomorrow for How to Relax Old Rolled Photos.

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