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    In every family, someone ends up with “the stuff.” It is the goal of The Family Curator to inspire, enlighten, and encourage other family curators in their efforts to preserve and share their own family treasures.

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    Sunday
    Feb242013

    WDYTYA Report 1: This Genealogy Event is BIG!

    Arriving at Olympia for Who Do You Think You Are LIVE

    Americans tend to think we do things in a "big" way at times, but U.S. family conferences have some keen competition in this weekend's Who Do You Think You Are LIVE event in London, billed as "The Biggest Family History Event in the World."

    Sponsored by ancestry.co.uk, WDYTYA LIVE is held in the Olympia exhibition center in West Kensington. I arrived at the conference center from Kensington High Street and caught a view of the hall from the train overpass.

     

    The historic venue opened 26 December 1886 with seating for 9000 people under a huge barrel vaulted roof, 115 feet high. The great hall covers more than one acre, and was the largest roofed arena in England when it was built. Olympia has played host to an wide assortment of events including: P.T. Barnum's Circus; dog, horse, home, and auto shows; a temporary civil prison camp during World War I; a transport center during World War II; and now WDYTYAL Genealogy and Family History Show (Wikipedia).

    The entrance opens directly into the center of the great hall where the hum of conversation and lectures compete for attention. The central booths (or stands) are large, beautifully designed productions. 

    Looking down on the findmypast.com stall featuring the new release of UK criminal records.

     

    A wide gallery runs around the second level offering a wonderful view of the show below, and access to private meeting rooms. I found a staircase at the corner of the hall and made my way to the gallery for an overview of the action.

     

    The huge barrel vaulted hall at Olympia covers more than an acre of exhibit area.

    Like any savvy conference attendee, one of the first things I noted was the location of the restrooms and food stands. In one corner of the gallery, a cafe/bar offered wine and beer with standard drinks and food, and on the main floor food booths from three popular restaurant chains offered a variety of selections. There was even an independent sausage-maker selling delicious sausage sandwiches on the main floor!

    A look around the main floor showed that many of the stands were set up as mini-lecture spaces with chairs, projector screen, and microphone. Posted schedules at each space displayed the frequent lectures on using specific software, search strategies, and other topics

     

    Alastair MacDonald presented on using DNA with genealogy.

    Exhibitors offered a huge variety of genealogy services and products. I saw everything from local histories and parish cemetery transcriptions to memorial stones. One of the biggest draws appeared to be the local society booths where regional publications and look-ups were available. In fact, everywhere I looked, visitors were engaged in look-ups, consultations, and searches with the help of knowledgeable staff or society members. 

     

    Visitors queued up to talk with The Photo Detective, Maureen Taylor in the upstairs Gallery.

    The WDYTYA website advises attendees to bring old photos for the photo experts, family heirlooms to show the heirloom experts, and documents and family tree for consultations. Although I didn't bring my research to show the experts, I found plenty of new ideas and products to investigate. Stay tuned for Part 2 of my report from Who Do You Think You Are LIVE, London 2013.


    Saturday
    Feb232013

    Meeting the Metropolitan Police at Who Do You Think You Are LIVE

    At Olympia, London for WDYTYA I stopped To chat with two former constables now patrolling the "Friends if the Metropolitan Police" beat. They gave me a lesson in the correct way to wear one's helmet -- low on your forehead-- with chin strap, of course.

    This organization would be a helpful resource for anyone with ancestors who served in the London Metropolitan Police.

    Monday
    Feb182013

    Keeping Cozy in the Cotswolds

     

    Snowy Cotswold country road.

    If you're a fan of English "cozies" you probably know about the Cotswolds. They are the picture perfect little towns in the rolling English countryside where evil hides in plain sight and only Miss Marple is sharp enough to spot the culprit. But I digress. . .

     

    Approaching Burford

    The Cotswolds in winter can be c-o-l-d.

    We drove across the hills through Bibury and then to Burford, a little village Mr. Curator and I visited several years ago with a London Walks tour. These guided tours are a fabulous way to see the sights without being tied to a formal long-term tour. Of course, we visited on a warm and sunny day in June, not a snowy winter February afternoon.

    Our tour that day stopped in the picturesque village of Burford where we visited a tiny stone church and walked around crooked gravestones. As we left the churchyard and walked along the lane I tripped on the cobblestones and my camera went skidding across the bumpy road. That was the end of my trusty Kodak and my pictures for that trip.

    This time, we barely slowed down as we drove through Burford. I saw the same quaint shops and the church steeple peeking over the wall from it's hidden location set back from the main street. Everything was quiet and still on this sleepy, and snowy weekday morning. 

    As we drove back to our hotel near Tetford the snow flurries faded and then stopped and the lightly dusted fields gave way to green hills dotted with grazing sheep and occasional patches of the first signs of spring in blooming snowdrops.

     

    Look closely toward the far field and you'll see the sheep grazing in the hills.

    This lovely garden and blooming snowdrops were right outside my room.

    Sunday
    Feb172013

    Stained Glass, Stone Coffins and Blind Corners

    Where Do You Think I Am?

     

    Malmesbury Abbey

    I can't hear the bells of Westminster Abbey from my room, but I do hear the local Ding Ding Church as my grandson calls St. Luke's only a few blocks away. I am here in London for next week's big genealogy show, Who Do You Think You Are LIVE, billed as "The Biggest Family History Event in the World." Lucky me, I also have a chance to visit with my son and family who live in London, not far from Olympia where WDYTYA LIVE will be held.

    And. . . we've had a chance to do a little greater London sightseeing. I arrived with plenty of time to get over jet-lag, and join the family on a trip to the Cotswolds west of London. If you've seen "The Hobbit" film or read Tolkien's Lord of the Rings, you've had a wonderful introduciton to the Cotswolds. When Tolkien and C.S. Lewis were friends and fellow instructors (dons) at Oxford, they belonged to a group of literary friends called the Inklings. Their wonderful fantasy worlds grew out of their friendship, and in some ways, both men gave the Cotswold countryside a place in their tales.

    It's a beautiful landscape of rolling hills, narrow roads borded by close hedgerows, and fields dotted with woolly sheep. It was the Shire for Tolkien, the English countryside that was being threatened by world events larger than anyone knew at the time.

    Tucked in among the stone farm houses and villages are old castles, churches, and ruins. In midwinter, many of the sites are closed, but with a talkative three-and-a-half year old who wanted to see knights and castles, we were motivated to find something that might inspire and impress. We didn't have to look far.

    Malmesbury Abbey, dating from the 12th century, was the center of life in Malmesbury, thought to be the first capital of England and home of the first King of England, Athelstan.

      

    Note the huge reflective mirrow in the corner to give drivers a view of what's coming their way.

    We arrived at the Abbey by winding through narrow cobbled streets and blind corners on a grey midweek afternoon. Snow flurries made us walk quickly through the churchyard, but I did notice the stone coffin outside the beautiful carved Norman porch. Evidenty, the coffin had been excavated when a car park was renovated (sound familiar?) and placed at the front of the church. The helpful docent inside the church explained that the holes in the coffin were indeed drainage holes, left to help remove bodily fluids from the stone tomb. I had another theory, but will have to do more research on the subject.

     

    The tomb of King Athelstan, crowned King of Wessex in 925, stands in the north aisle of the Abbey. It's really only a memorial, however, as his remains were buried under a church tower, and the location is now lost. (Sounds a bit like the Richard III story, doesn't it?) Beautiful stained glass windows are espeically noticable. The windows from William Morris' shop made in 1901, are saturated with color and fabulous examples of early 20th century style.

     

    Luce Memorial Window, crafted in William Morris' workshops 1901

    Outside, we braved the snow flurries to stand and look up at the abbey walls and ruins where a great spire once stood higher than that of Salisbury Cathedral. I may not have ancestors buried in the churchyard at Malmesbury Abbey, but it was a very worthwhile afternoon.

     

     Malmesbury Abbey Churchyard

     

    Thursday
    Feb142013

    Join Me for a Chat with The Armchair Genealogist About Writing and Publishing 

     

    This week I'm honored to join Lynn Palermo during the Family History Writing Challenge for an interview at The Armchair Chair Genealogist about writing my new book How to Archive Family Keepsakes. I think Lynn must have been looking over my shoulder because she was on target with some great questions, from motivational tricks to working with a publisher.

    It isn't always easy to maintain focus and enthusiasm during a long writing project -- or even a month-long writing challenge! -- but you can do it! I hope you will join join us today at The Armchair Genealogist for another chat about the writing life, and peek inside my office in yesterday's post (the tidiness may not last long!)

     

    Wednesday
    Feb132013

    Peek Inside My Office and Chat at The Armchair Genealogist

    It's nearly the midway point in the Family History Writing Challenge, and if you're like me, it can be hard to maintain focus on a writing project about halfway through. I get excited about starting and ending a project, but many times, the middle can be a bit of slog and I have to pull all kinds of tricks to keep working. 

    Last month, during the blog book tour for How to Archive Family Keepsakes, Lynn and I talked about the book's focus on organization as a first-step toward becoming a more effective researcher and family history writer in A Coffee, A Comfy Chair, and a Q&A with the Author. On Thursday, 14 February, we continue the conversation at The Armchair Genealogist to talk about the writing, publishing, and marketing aspect of authorship. In these days of e-books, blogs, and self-publishing, it's not enough to simply write a book; authors have to be ready to take on many roles to get the word out about their work.

    Lynn's questions made me feel so "professional" that I was motivated to clean up my desk and snap a few pictures. My office doesn't always look this tidy, but I sure do feel more in control when it's like this.

    DML office

     

    DML desk

    Sometimes, a mid-project "tidy up" is all it takes to help me get over the slump and back to work. Other times I have to employ other tricks, like playing games with word counts or promising myself a special coffee treat. Whatever it takes, it's worth it if it can keep me moving and avoid the dreaded "writer's block."

    You might notice in the photos that my desk faces a wall in my office. I've thought about hanging a gallery of photos around the bulletin board, but I know it would probably tempt me to drift off into who-knows-where so I keep putting off that little decorating project. There is a wall of windows at my back, which isn't great for glare, but the trees outside the window and sheer curtains and blinds keep it pleasant. I don't work with music or tv, in fact I work best when it's pretty quiet and find that neighborhood noise is an unwelcome distraction. My office is quite small, about 9 x 12, but just right as a cozy niche for a day with words.

    I hope you'll join us this week at The Armchair Genealogist as we talk about writing, publishing, and marketing a family history book. I've got an extra chair in my office too!

    Friday
    Feb082013

    Ready to Get Started Organizing Your Family Keepsakes?

    Did the blog book tour leave you motivated to organize and digitize your family photos, documents, and letters? When I inherited my grandmother's treasures in 2000, I didn't know where to begin. I spent a lot of time just looking at stuff, reading letters, examining old photos, and trying to make sense of what I had. 

    If you're reading my book How to Archive Family Keepsakes, I suggest you use the book as a workbook to guide you step-by-step from taking stock to sorting and preserving. The 10 Checkpoints in chapters 1 through 5 are designed a worksheets to help you gain control of the project without being overwhelmed. 

    Just "looking at things" isn't a bad way to start a family archive project. You need to know what you have before you can do much of anything. The trick is, you want to MAINTAIN ORDER at all times (yes, that's a firm directive). By keeping "like with like" you help retain context that can provide clues to identification and meaning.

    Always work with clean hands on a sturdy clean surface. White cotton gloves are sometimes recommended, but they can be clumsy and actually cause damage too. It may be easier, and less risky to carefully handle paper and photos by the edges with clean hands. 

    Order in the Archive

    The original owner is the first level of organization important to maintain. For many years, I was only concerned with my maternal grandmother Arline's collection. Then, my father started sending over things from his parents, bit by bit. They didn't arrive in boxes, but as individual items, and were easily misplaced or mixed in with Arline's albums and boxes.

    Keep each collection separated by original owner or family.

    Keep items that arrive in groups or packets together, even if they are all different kinds of things such as photos, ticket stubs, or letters. Ask yourself why they were kept at all, and why they might be in this particular group?

    Maybe the assorted items are souvenirs of a weekend getaway, or mementoes from a relationship. The answer might not even be obvious for a long time. You can move things into archival envelopes and boxes when the time comes, but when you are just beginning to work with a collection, resist the urge to reorganize. 

    Get to know your family history treasures, but keep order in the archive.

    Tuesday
    Feb052013

    Student Genealogy Grant Announced

     

    A.C. Ivory and Elyse Doerflinger,
    Recipients of the 2012 Suzanne Freeman Student Genealogy Grant
    SCGS Jamboree Gala, Burbank CA

    Do you know a young genealogist who could use $500 toward their family history education and free registration to the Southern California Genealogy Jamboree in June 2013?

    The Suzanne Winsor Freeman Memorial Grant Committee is pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for the 2013 Student Genealogy Grant, and that the SCGS Jamboree will once again provide the recipient with free three-day registration.

    Any genealogist who is between the ages of 18 and 25 and has attended school in the last 12 months is eligible to apply. The recipient must attend the 2013 SCGS Jamboree in Burbank, California to receive the award.

    The $500 cash award was established in 2010 in memory of Suzanne Winsor Freeman, family historian and life-long volunteer, and an enthusiastic annual attendee at the SCGS Jamboree.

    Denise Levenick and her mother, Suzanne Freeman
    2010 SCGS Jamboree, Delivering Geneabloggers Welcome Bags
     

    “The Freeman Student Genealogy Grant pays tribute to these interests by awarding the annual cash grant to a young genealogist attending the SCGS Jamboree, Southern California’s premiere regional genealogy conference,” notes Denise Levenick, committee chair and Freeman’s daughter.

    “We are especially grateful to Jamboree for providing a three-day conference registration to the grant recipient,” she adds. “SCGS is truly a leader in conference organizations by encouraging youth involvement in genealogy through the popular Kids Camp program and now through the student grant project.”

    Past recipients of the award include Elyse Doerflinger (Lomita, California), A.C. Ivory (Salt Lake City, Utah), and Anthony Ray (Palmdale, California).

    Funding for the cash award is provided by the family grant program; Jamboree registration is provided by the conference.

    Complete details and application materials are available at The Family Curator, Suzanne Freeman Student Grant. Application deadline is Monday, 18 March 2013.

    Follow Grant News at TheFamilyCurator.com

    For More Information Contact: Denise Levenick, swfgrant@gmail.com.

    Suzanne Winsor Freeman Obituary: TheFamilyCurator.com

    Monday
    Feb042013

    Learn More About Metadata

    I've been a fan of adding value to files with metadata for a long time. If you've ever used your computer search engine to find a specific file and the only identifier is a name like "lastsatfun.doc" or "IMG_0124.JPG," you know how difficult the task can be.

    Metadata, or "data about data," adds simple tags to files making them easier to find and giving you a chance to group, organize, and understand the relationships between files with the same tags. It's a bit like using a index to your files; your job is to provide the key words that make the index valuable.

    If you are unfamiliar with the term "metadata" you might wonder why I'm throwing out other words like "tags" and "keywords." Many software programs use these terms interchangeably. Sometimes they function in slightly different ways, but essentially metadata tags, and keywords all do a similar task by classifying your files for better access.

    Want to learn more? You are in luck because on 7 February 2013 DearMYRTLE will be hosting "Metadata is your Friend" a DearMYRTLE Workshop Webinar with Denise Barrett Olson and Thomas MacEntee.

    Way back in the early days of my adventures in archiving, I read Denise Olson's posts about metadata and knew I had found a kindred soul. With three tech-gurus meeting to talk about using metadata in your family history work, Thursday's webinar workshop promises to be an outstanding event.

    Sign up at DearMYRTLE to attend Thursday, February at 6pm. And, while you are waiting for the event, do a little advance homework so you are ready to get as much as you can from the evening --

    Photo Metadata, at the Moultrie Creek Gazette

    Using Adobe Lightroom to Manage Genealogy Images, at The Family Curator

    Thursday
    Jan312013

    Are You Ready for the Family History Writing Challenge?

    FH WritingChal badge

    Researching family history is one thing; writing about it is another. The Armchair Genealogist has thrown down the glove and challenged family historians to pick up a pen and commit to writing about their family history. "If not now, then when?" asks Lynn Palermo, writer and creator The Family History Challenge.

    The 28-day project runs throughout the month of February. The event is simple, you choose --

    • who or what you want to write about
    • how many words per day to write
    • where to write

    The best part 

    • No Judge, No Jury
    • Just write, edit later

    When you sign up for the challenge, you receive an encouraging daily email and can participate in the challenge forum to share ideas and inspiration. Still not sure, check out the Family History Writing Challenge website for "28 Days of Motivation" and the Challenge Blog for posts from last year's event.

    I'm picking up the glove; are you?

    Tuesday
    Jan292013

    Your Opinion Counts! Blog Book Tour Survey Wants You!

     Did you read one or more posts during the How to Archive Keepsake Blog Book Tour? If so, I'd value your opinion about the tour in this short Book Tour Survey.

    Did you enjoy the articles you read?

    Were you looking for more reviews?

    More book excerpts?

    More fascinating exclusive content?

    Dont' be shy. . . Please share your thoughts in this short 10 question survey, with my appreciation for your time and interest.

    Click HERE for the Survey. Thank you.

     

    Saturday
    Jan262013

    More Blog Book Tour News: Giveaway Winners, New Reviews and Thank YOUs!

     

    Thank you for joining the How to Archive Family Keepsakes Blog Book Tour -- from Southern California to Ontario, Canada, from Texas to Illinois to Utah. I would love to hear what you think about the tour and invite you to complete a short survey here

    More to Read

    You'll also find a special Blog Book Tour encore post at The Catholic Gene, on a subject of interest to many genealogists and family historians -- The Books They Leave Behind: Preserving Family Bibles and Religious Books.

    And, for a book review from expert researcher Lisa Alzo, visit The Accidental Genealogist to read For the Packrat and the Genealogist: A Review of How to Archive Family Keepsakes.

    Purchase My Book and Support the Student Genealogy Grant

    Visit the Book Page to order, or learn more information about How to Archive Family Keepsakes. Book purchases throughout the tour help fund the 2013 Student Genealogy Grant.

    Giveaway Winners

    Congratulations to the winners of the How to Archive Family Keepsakes Blog Book Tour. Please contact me with your full name and address, or email so that I can send you your prize!

    Week 1 Winner of the Family History Photo Archive Kit --
    Mary Nelson, commenter at 4YourFamilyStories

    Week 1 Runners Up, free copy of How to Archive Family Keepsakes -- 
    Annemarie Taylor, commenter at 4YourFamilyStories
    Tina Telesca, commenter at The Armchair Genealogist

    Week 2 Winner of the Family History Oversize Archive Kit -- 
    Robyn, commenter at The Practical Archivist

    Week 2 Runner Up, free copy of How to Archive Family Keepsakes -- 
    Cheryl Smallwood-Roberts, commenter at The In-Depth Genealogist

    Twitter Tweeter Winner, free PDF copy of How to Archive Family Keepsakes --
    MariannSRegan 

    FaceBook Friend Winner, free PDF copy of How to Archive Family Keepsakes --
    Eli Melitz 

    Google+ Winner, free PDF copy of How to Archive Family Keepsakes --
    Jenna Mills 

    Thank You Blog Book Tour Hosts

    A special thank you to each host on the Archive Keepsake Blog Book Tour and all the readers who followed along. I hope that you have picked a few tips for working with your own family keepsakes.

    Archive Keepsakes Blog Tour Hosts
    (a virtual round of applause...)

     

    Friday, January 11 – 
    Meet and Greet Author Denise Levenick -- 5 Little Known Facts About The Family Curator 
    with Host Thomas MacEntee at GeneaBloggers

     

     

    Saturday, January 12 – 
    7 Steps Toward a Paperless Genenealogy Office &Podcast Interview Book Excerpt 
    with Host Lisa Louise Cooke atGenealogy Gems Podcast Blog

     

     

    Sunday, January 13 –

    How to Read Your Ancestor Like a Book, Guest Post at Moultrie Creek Gazette, plusInterview & Review by Bookseller Denise Olson of Moultrie Creek Books

     

     

     

    Monday, January 14 –
    Scanner Options for Genealogists Book Excerpt at
    4 Your Family Story, plus Book Review 
    by Tech Expert Caroline Pointer

     

     

    Tuesday, January 15 – 
    What to Save? What to Toss? Guest Post and FREE Handout at Olive Tree Genealogy 
    with Host Lorine McGinnis Schulze

     

     

    Wednesday, January 16 – 
    A Coffee, A Comfy Chair and a Q & A with Author Denise Levenick at The Armchair Genealogist

     

     

     

     

    Thursday, January 17 –

    Many Things Thursday
    speaks to a love of old photographs at
    Shades of the Departed
    with footnoteMaven. 

     

     

    Friday, January 18 – 
    First, Save History Guest Post 
    at Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories
    with Dr. Bill Smith

     


    Saturday, January 19 – Week 1 Giveaway Winners at The Family Curator 

     

    Sunday, January 20 –
    Got Genealogy Records? Book Excerpt
    with Sally Jacobs at Practical Archivist

     

     

     

    Monday, January 21 – 
    Bashing Brick Walls, One Brick at a Time 
    Guest Post at The In-Depth Genealogist

     

     

     

    Tuesday, January 22 – 
    How to Preserve Vintage Cookbooks Book Excerpt at Food. Family. Ephemera
    with Gena Philibert-Ortega

     

     

     

    Wednesday, January 23 – 
    Video Interview and Free Download 
    with Myrt at DearMYRTLE

     

     

    Thursday, January 24 –
    6 Tips for Scanning Success Guest Post 
    with Miriam Robbins at AnceStories

     

     

     

    Friday, January 25 - Saving Time: Caring for Heirloom Clocks 
    Guest Post at The Houstory Hearth

     

     

    Friday
    Jan252013

    Caring for Antique Clocks: Blog Book Tour Visits The Houstory Hearth

    Tick Tock, Caring for Your Heirloom Clock: Guest Post for the How to Archive Family Keepsakes Blog Book Tour

    It’s not surprising that The Heirloom Registry was born when Dan and Mike Hiestand wanted to share the story of their heirloom grandfather clock. Watches, clocks, and timepieces of all shapes and sizes have been favorite family keepsakes for generations.

    Houstory Publishing and I share a common interest in preserving family treasures, and I’m delighted to share a few tips for clock care from my new book How to Archive Family Keepsakes with readers of The Houstory Hearth Blog.

    Saving Time: Caring for Your Heirloom Clock

    Timepieces are one of the most popular family heirlooms passed on from generation to generation, and with proper care and regular maintenance you can help keep your keepsake watch or clock ticking well into the next century.

    Most clocks consist of two distinct parts, the clock itself and the outer case. Grandfather clocks, cuckoo clocks, and mantle clocks are often made of wood and metal parts. Decorative clocks may be constructed from brass, bronze, marble, plastic, or other materials. Wristwatches, pocket watches, and ladies' brooch watches are usually cased in silver, gold, or a combination of materials. (continue reading at The Houstory Hearth). . .

    Join the Blog Tour

    Join the Blog Book Tour for How to Archive Family Keepsakes January 10-26, 2013 for author interviews, book excerpts, giveaways, and more. Visit the Blog Book Tour Page at The Family Curator website for the complete schedule.

    Proceeds from the sale of How to Archive Family Keepsakes during the Book Tour will help fund the 2013 Student Genealogy Grant founded in 2010 in honor of Denise’s mother, Suzanne Winsor Freeman.

    Ready to purchase your own copy of How to Archive Family Keepsakes? Now available in both PRINT and eBook editions. Click the button to see ordering options

    Blog Book Tour Giveaways

    Comment on daily Book Blog Tour Post
    Tweet the Tour Twitter @FamilyCurator #keepsakebooktour
    Share the Tour on FaceBook, Google+, Goodreads

    It’s easy to enter to win a free copy of Denise’s new book or one of the weekly giveaway prizes. All you have to do is leave a comment to the Blog Tour Post hosted at one of the official tour blogs. Random winners will also be selected from social media comments on Twitter, FaceBook, and Google+.

    Each blog tour post comment gives you one chance to win; one entry per post per day, please. Leave a comment at each stop on the blog tour and increase your chances of winning. The lucky names will be announced each Saturday during the tour at The Family Curator.

    Thursday
    Jan242013

    Scanning Tips: Blog Book Tour Visits AnceStories

    6 Tips for Scanning Success, Guest Post for the How to Archive Family Keepsakes Blog Book Tour

    In February 2013, AnceStories’ Scanfest will be Six Years Old! Miriam Robbins organizes and hosts this popular monthly event that welcomes anyone with a stack of scanning and a few hours to spend chatting with other family historians. Scanning can be a boring task, but Scanfest actually makes it fun!

    Maximize your scanning time with these tips to help you get the most from your scanning equipment and make the best use of your scanning hours. 

    The #1 Secret to Scanning Success

    Are you getting the best possible results when you digitize family photos and documents? Check your scanning savvy with these 6 Tips for Scanning Success: (continue reading at AnceStories). . .

    Join the Blog Tour

    Join the Blog Book Tour for How to Archive Family Keepsakes January 10-26, 2013 for author interviews, book excerpts, giveaways, and more. Visit the Blog Book Tour Page at The Family Curator website for the complete schedule.

    Proceeds from the sale of How to Archive Family Keepsakes during the Book Tour will help fund the 2013 Student Genealogy Grant founded in 2010 in honor of Denise’s mother, Suzanne Winsor Freeman.

    Ready to purchase your own copy of How to Archive Family Keepsakes? Now available in both PRINT and eBook editions. Click the button to see ordering options


    Blog Book Tour Giveaways

    Comment on daily Book Blog Tour Post
    Tweet the Tour Twitter @FamilyCurator #keepsakebooktour
    Share the Tour on FaceBook, Google+, Goodreads

    It’s easy to enter to win a free copy of Denise’s new book or one of the weekly giveaway prizes. All you have to do is leave a comment to the Blog Tour Post hosted at one of the official tour blogs. Random winners will also be selected from social media comments on Twitter, FaceBook, and Google+.

    Each blog tour post comment gives you one chance to win; one entry per post per day, please. Leave a comment at each stop on the blog tour and increase your chances of winning. The lucky names will be announced each Saturday during the tour at The Family Curator.

    Wednesday
    Jan232013

    Video Interview and FREE Download, Blog Book Tour Visits DearMYRTLE

    The Future of Your Genealogy Research

    I am delighted to be a Guest today for a special recorded video interview with DearMYRTLE on the Blog Book Tour for my new book How to Archive Family Keepsakes. We all know that nothing much is certain, except for "death and taxes." The fate of our genealogy records and research are no exception. Without a plan for the future, our careful work could all end up in the trash.

    .Join Myrt and I as we talk about the future of our family history records and research, from donation options to inheritance. Blog Tour visitors will also discover the exclusive link to a FREE downloadable Genealogical Codicil that can be used to help make your wishes known to your family and friends.

    from DearMYRTLE
    DearREADERS,
    You've heard about The Family Curator's Blog Book Tour, mentioned earlier this month in my post Great way to raise funds for student participation. Well, today, Denise Levenick comes to visit DearMYRTLE's Blog in the form of this video interview.  Be sure to scroll down for info about the free copy of the "Genealogy Codicil" from Denise's book. (continue at DearMYRTLE). .  .

     

     Ready to purchase your own copy of How to Archive Family Keepsakes? Now available in both PRINT and eBook editions. Click the button to see ordering options.

    Win an Oversize Archive Kit

    Join us for Week 2 of the Blog Book Tour for more exclusive articles on working with family history photos, documents, and artifacts, and a chance to win the Week 2 Giveaway Prize. Enter by leaving a comment at the the Guest Blog Post. Each comment gives you one chance to win; one entry per post, please. Leave a comment at each stop on the blog tour and increase your chances of winning. Check the Blog Tour Schedule and catch up on any posts you may have missed. Winners will be announced on Saturday, 26 January 2013.