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    « We're Puttin' on Our Shades for Golden Rule Days, Tuesday's Tip | Main | Meet Mr. Curator at #SCGS2013 Jamboree: Vintage Treasure Chest Thursday »
    Monday
    Jun102013

    5 New Things I Learned at #SCGS2013 Jamboree Including New Data on the Hockey Gene

    . . . and a few wild and crazy discoveries about my genealogy friends.

    Nextgen meetup

    Next Gen MeetUp at Jamboree #SCGS2013 

    1. The Genealogy Generation Gap Has Been Zapped!

    The Chart Chick Janet Hovorka is really on to something with her new book, Zap the Grandma Gap -- If you didn't know it already, genealogy has become a multi-generational passion, and a look around the Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree conference proves it!

    The exact numbers haven't been released, but as a long-time Jamboree attendee, I could see that Y- and Z-generation Jamboree attendees, speakers, and exhibitors were present in greater numbers than ever before at the 2013 event.

    The 2013 Student Genealogy Grant recipient Mike Savoca was a first-time Jamboree attendee, but he found plenty of student-company with Elyse Doerflinger, Anthony Ray, Mike Melendez, and other young genealogists.

    The new NextGen Genealogy Network held a standing-room only virtual meet-up organized by Elyse to introduce Jamboree to NextGen organizers. 

    A look 'round the exhibit hall showed new faces with new products, too. Treelines' Tammy Hepps was on hand to show off her online new story-telling software after winning the Developer's Prize at RootsTech 2013.

    2. Genetic Genealogy is HOT!

    Everyone was talking about the DNA Day held as a pre-conference event on Thursday, June 6. Each session sounded better than the last, featuring respected scholars and researchers presenting on various aspects of genetic genealogy.

    I was sorry to miss this event, but will be sure to catch it if there is an encore next year! You know a conference is good when the audio-visual recording staff is still talking about it two days later.

    Blog summit paul hawthorne

    Bloggers' Summit, Host Thomas MacEntee; 
    from left Paula Stuart-Warren, Judy G. Russell, Denise Levenick, CeCe Moore
    (photo courtesy J. Paul Hawthorne) 

    3. Genealogy Blogging is Not Going Away

    I was privileged to join Paula Stuart-Warren, CeCe Moore, Judy G. Russell at the Bloggers' Summit moderated by GeneaBloggers' Thomas MacEntee. This annual event is a touchpoint for genealogy bloggers and gives a good sense of how we got where we are and what to look for in the future.

    With over 3,000 genealogy blogs currently listed at the GeneaBloggers website, it's clear that blogging has found an audience in the genealogy community. You'd think that everyone was reading genealogy blogs, but in reality, I heard a comment after the summit that only about 10% of genealogists regularly read blogs. If that figure is correct, a lot of family historians are missing out on some great resources.

    Although each panelist admitted that there just isn't time enough to read all the blogs we'd like to cover, no one saw blogs diminishing in popularity anytime soon. In fact, one of the first questions from the audience was about starting a genealogy blog.

    4. Genealogy Can Be Really Really Funny

    Dan Poffenberger's presentation at the Sunday morning scholarship breakfast was the best early-morning wake-up call I've heard in a long time. He gave a VERY humorous look at some of the actual records he's found along his research career, including pre-cradle to post-grave excerpts of parish registers, census records, wills, and other documents. Dan also revealed a hint of what it's like growing up with an unusual surname.

    5. Researching the "Hockey Gene"

    Inquiring minds wanted to know: Is "hockey love/obsession/passion" acquired or inherited? So, I went to the best source I know for All Things Hockey: Rhonda R. McClure (aka "nationally  recognized genealogist and lecturer on New England, immigration and naturalization, Italian, German, institutional, fraternal and computerized genealogy. . ."). 

    Rhonda's name pops up frequently as a genealogy lecturer, and nearly as often on Facebook cheering on her ice-favorites. I figured she was the go-to resource for this specialized research query.

    The question: "How did you become interested (read: obsessed) with ice hockey?"

    Her answer: "I'm from New Hampshire."

    So, there you have it. Geographic Genetics. 

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    Reader Comments (2)

    Thanks for this fun account of the Jamboree! I'm glad to hear that the generation gap has been zapped (or is in the process) and that blogs are still "in." I'm still reading (I guess I belong to the 10%) and will be writing again as soon as I prepare our multi-family tree for archiving in July.

    June 12, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterMariann Regan

    One of these days we will meet-up, Mariann, and have so much to talk about. You would love Jamboree! So much energy.

    June 13, 2013 | Registered CommenterFamily Curator

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